Sanford Ballard Dole and His Hawaii: With an Analysis of Justice Dole's Legal Opinions

By Ethel M. Damon | Go to book overview

Chapter VI
THIRTY HISTORIC DAYS
1872-1873

SANFORD DOLE himself wrote the definitive account of political events at the turn of the year 1872 to 1873 while he was living through those momentous thirty days or shortly `hereafter. Six years earlier, while a student at Williams College, he had foreseen this moment when, at the death of Kamehameha V, the Hawaiian people would become king-makers through their own right of representation. Now as a man of twenty-eight young Dole was beginning to make his way as a citizen of his native land. When he wrote the account which forms this present chapter, he with others rightly looked forward to constitutional liberty. Before his paper was first printed however, a scant year later, these hopes were dying with the new sovereign. Could even Sanford Dole have then foreseen what political changes the next twenty years were to bring?

Printed in five weekly installments in the Pacific Commercial Advertiser of January, 1874, this study was read by request fortyone years later before the Hawaiian Historical Society. And in 1936 it became, by Sanford Dole's own earlier selection, the leading article to introduce his series of nine papers prepared to complement Lorrin A. Thurston's volumes on the Hawaiian Revolution. Its first and third uses therefore span the half-century of his life from fledgling lawyer to distinguished statesman. Here, it foreshadows Dole's interests and long public career.

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