Sanford Ballard Dole and His Hawaii: With an Analysis of Justice Dole's Legal Opinions

By Ethel M. Damon | Go to book overview

Chapter VII
HONOLULU
1874-1879

ALL THE LOYALTY of his people, however, proved powerless to extend King Lunalilo's reign beyond the threshold of its second year. Beloved for his kindliness, his skill in music and his democratic habit of talking personally with his people, they had shouted, "This is our King." He promised and planned amendment of the Constitution of 1864, but before this could be approved by the Legislature, his life was cut short by tuberculosis.

Again minute guns from Punchbowl sounded a king's requiem. It was Wednesday, February 4, 1874. Good King Lunalilo this day lay in state from ten in the morning until two in the afternoon.

This sovereign had been the people's leader, even before they had acclaimed him in the old Stone Church, seated on his mother's great cloak of golden feathers. This ceremony seemed to Sanford Dole "rather like the inauguration of a president than the coronation of a king." Rightly Lunalilo lies buried beside that church in the heart of the town at Kawaiahao. With him lie entombed the hopes of many good men.

The thirty days of Hawaiian history, so aptly pictured by Sanford Dole, echoed sadly on February 6, 1874. At a meeting of the Hawaiian Bar on that day Mr. Justice Hartwell's measured estimate of Lunalilo struck home when he said: "I think we have all felt that in his hands Constitutional liberty was safe. This is saying a good deal of any sovereign. But it is saying the simple truth of Lunalilo." And unanimous approval passed S. B. Dole's resolution that "the Bar do wear mourning for thirty days and that the Court Room be draped."

On the very afternoon of the 4th citizens had crowded to a mass

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