Sanford Ballard Dole and His Hawaii: With an Analysis of Justice Dole's Legal Opinions

By Ethel M. Damon | Go to book overview

Chapter VIII
TOWN MEETINGS 1880-1883

SIGNIFICANT of public unrest in January 1880 is Sanford Dole's thought of possibly running for the Legislature from Honolulu. Although the time for this action was not yet appointed, more than one trend in public affairs gave cause for anxiety to citizens who still hoped for a representative government. Early in March Dole's position was clearly outlined in writing to his brother: "The currency question waxeth hot in the papers. The Bank assists the Advertiser in its leaders on the subject. We intend to fight it out if it takes all summer. We particularly oppose the Advertiser upon general and miscellaneous impeachments. It has laid itself open of late to straight thrusts and of course we must use the opportunities."

Evidently these straight thrusts from the Gazette were severe. By May, Dole had switched off from the Gazette and was to have full control of the literary output of the Advertiser, Black, the publisher, acceding unconditionally to his terms. But after two weeks this agreement had to be canceled: Gibson, Dole wrote, appeared to be the real editor; at least, Dole's material was revised, "corrected or suppressed at somebody's sweet will; now I am fancy free; Hartwell is very anxious to transfer the Gazette to me or to someone else, but I don't bite worth a cent."

The king was beginning definitely to show his ambitions, bearing out Nevins Armstrong's comment that representative government was an unknown quantity to Kalakaua. Flattered both by Gibson and an Italian adventurer, Celso Caesar Moreno, Kalakaua had by various means assembled enough "King's men" in the Legislature to pass a bill subsidizing Moreno's plan for a steamship line to China. When other and still more dangerous bills failed of passage, His Majesty prorogued the Legislature, and

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