Only Yesterday

By S. Y. Agnon; Barbara Harshav | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THIRTEEN
Memorial Stones

1

Isaac finished his work in the Hungarian neighborhood and everyone was satisfied with what he had done. Blessed hands has Isaac and everything he does he does well. Too bad the artisan himself isn't as handsome as his work. He wears a short jacket and has neither sidelocks nor beard. It's amazing that Reb Moyshe Amram, the father-inlaw of Reb Fayesh, is nice to him. But Reb Moyshe Amram is new in the Land and in some things he behaves as he would Outside the Land. It would be interesting to know what Reb Fayesh will say when he sees that Polak frequenting his house.

Isaac finished his work in the Hungarian Houses and is already working in other places in the city. New houses are being built and even the old ones want to be restored. This one because it was time for it to be restored and that one because it saw its comrade being restored and wanted to restore himself. Isaac sometimes works in a new house and sometimes in an old house. He paints doors and shutters, walls and ceilings, whatever the landlord wants and whatever the house needs.


2

Isaac has another trade, too, making signs and painting memorial stones. From all over the globe and from distant islands, generous philanthropists establish houses and courtyards, memorials to the holiness of the Lord and His Land, to His Torah and those who study it, so that every person with love of Jerusalem in his heart and with means erects a memorial to himself in Jerusalem, builds a house and dedicates it, buys a courtyard and dedicates it. And when the Holy-

-282-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Only Yesterday
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 652

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.