Only Yesterday

By S. Y. Agnon; Barbara Harshav | Go to book overview

CHAPTER NINETEEN
Leaves the Dog and Concerns Only Reb Fayesh

1

More dead than alive, Reb Fayesh was brought home. His blood was chilled and his limbs were paralyzed. His tongue was stuck to his palate and his thoughts were scrambled. Out of an unclear consciousness, he pondered, Our Rabbis said that envoys of the Commandments come to no harm. So why was I harmed? Can we suspect the Lord of passing judgment without justice?

The Holy-One-Blessed-Be-He does not pass judgment without justice. Whatever He does, He does well in its time and its season, for He had warned the Children of Israel not to attack one another, but because of the voices of quarrel, His voice was not heard, the voice of the Almighty. Many of them were afflicted, in their fortune or their body, and they haven't yet learned the moral. For, they said, A habit that found favor in the eyes of our forefathers could it be unclean for us. And they didn't know that there are things that were beautiful in ancient times and ugly in modern times.

Reb Fayesh's thoughts gradually ceased. His limbs fell still and his thoughts left him. Sleep descended upon him and he dozed off. Torah and Commandments, good and evil deeds, Hell and Paradise, This World and the World-to-Come went off, and nothing was left but this body sunk in pillows and blankets and sweating. His lips rounded and were covered with saliva. At times they looked blue, at times purple. At first Rebecca diligently wiped them. When she saw that it was endless, her hands slackened and she left him alone. But Shifra didn't leave him alone. As a butterfly spreads her wings on a gray day and shakes them, thus Shifra hovered over him with a colorful rag in her hand and wiped his lips. If he stirred—he looked

-328-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Only Yesterday
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 652

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.