Only Yesterday

By S. Y. Agnon; Barbara Harshav | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWENTY-TWO
From Place to Place

1

As usual on most summer Sabbaths, Isaac kept to his room because of the dust and because the restaurants of Jerusalem are locked to customers. He ate what he ate and drank what he drank, things that bore a person's kidneys, stretched out on his bed and took himself off to another place. He began imagining the room where he was born and the room where his mother died and the room where he lived before he ascended to the Land. And for every single room, he recalled what happened there, until he came to think about the nature of time.

Time is divided into several times, past, present, and future. Past and future are two definite periods separated from time as one thing is separate from another, but the past has a beginning and an end, while the future has no end. He who is confident looks forward to what is to come, he who is not confident worries about his future. The optimist forgets the past, the pessimist doesn't forget the past. But the present, even though it is separate from time, is not really time, but is the median between past and future and supports and is supported by what was before it and what will be after it. Now I'll come back to my starting point, to my city and my place. What is my city doing at this moment? At this moment, my city is waking up from the Sabbath sleep and drinking something hot or something cold, tea or fruit juice, and eating cakes filled with fruit or with sweet cheese and raisins. After they have eaten and drunk, they put on Sabbath clothes and go in a group to the forest and sit in the shade of trees and fear neither the dust nor the sun. Afterward, they go back to their houses and from the cellar they bring up jars and pitchers of sour milk and

-349-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Only Yesterday
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 652

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.