Only Yesterday

By S. Y. Agnon; Barbara Harshav | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWENTY-FOUR
Broken Vessels

1

On every single one of the stone steps on the way to the Western Wall are flocks of paupers, cripples, and blind men, some have no arms, some have lame legs, some have swollen necks, and some are swollen with hunger and some are shriveled with despair, and there are other invalids and diseased people, fragments of people whose Creator left them in the middle of His work and didn't finish their creation, and when He left them, He left His hand on them and increased their torments. Or their Creator did finish them and strict justice struck them. And every step down had a sorrow greater than the last one. When you have descended all those stairs, you see a bundle of rags. You think they're rags, but they are a woman and her daughter, and it's not clear if the daughter is younger than her mother, but it is clear that they have the same calamity of hunger. Their eyes look straight ahead, but it's not the eyes that seem to be looking, but the pus in the eyes. Those remnants of bodies lie before our precious Temple that was destroyed, a place where the Holy-One-Blessed-Be-He heard every prayer and every supplication of any child of Israel and filled his request, and now that it is destroyed, they pray and supplicate and request and the prayer isn't heard. And if it is heard, it achieves only half, a person's soul is saved but his body isn't.

Old men and women come and go, and as they walk, they bend over at every single stair and give their brothers and sisters a fig or a date or a piece of sugar or a penny. It's forbidden to find fault with the principles of the Holy One, that He gives this one a lot and that one He doesn't give anything. Here it must be said that He did not give the former much more than the latter. But some have con-

-367-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Only Yesterday
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 652

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.