Only Yesterday

By S. Y. Agnon; Barbara Harshav | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWO
Tribulations of Travel

1

Close to sundown, the full wagon left, harnessed to three horses, loaded with nine people. The carter sat on his box and brandished the whip. The horses picked up their feet and started trotting easily and not fast. Easily, to make it easy for their owner to show the passengers they can rely on his horses, and not fast, for the road was long and the wagon was heavy.

The wagon left the city, leaving behind Jerusalem and its neighborhoods. The wheels rolled and they came to the Valley of Niftoah. And from the valley on the right, Kfar Lifta appeared, surrounded by trees and gardens. From there, the wagon rolled on and came to Motza. The horses stood still by themselves, for it is a simple custom that when they get to Motza, the horses stand still to rest a bit before they climb up the mountain. The passengers who weren't yet weary from the trip and were neither hungry nor thirsty, complained about the carter, who stopped his horses. But the carter looked benevolently at his horses who know the time for every purpose.

After they rested a bit, the carter signaled to them that the time had come for them to go. They bent their knees and bowed their heads and started going. The roads are winding, twisting and rising, they spin the cart and circle around themselves. And suddenly they seemed to descend into themselves and swallow themselves up. The cart rises up, and seems barely suspended and moving on thin air. The horses clop their feet on stones and knots and dirt, and dirt and knots and stones spray from under their feet, and they are suspended on thin air. The passengers began to fear they would fall and their bones would be strewn around. One remembered his wife and his

-377-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Only Yesterday
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 652

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.