Only Yesterday

By S. Y. Agnon; Barbara Harshav | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THIRTEEN
On the Sabbath Day

1

Isaac returned to his hotel. That air prevailed in the house that prevails in new hotels on the Sabbath morning. The hotel owners hadn't yet gotten out of bed because the guests get up late, and the guests get up late because today is the Sabbath and they don't have anything to do. But it isn't like that in other inns, where everyone gets up early on the Sabbath, Hasidim to immerse at dawn and Mitnagdim for prayer, and average people sit over a cup of hot tea and read Scripture, twice in the original and once in the Aramaic Targum.

On the table in the corridor stood a sooty lamp with overturned glasses and empty bottles and almond shells and date pits left over from the little girl's birthday party, and buttons that dropped off and flowers that withered were scattered on the floor and a smell of dampness came from the sea and a smell of burned kerosene bubbled up from the kitchen. The hotel owners didn't abstain from lighting the samovar on the Sabbath, but they also put a kettle on the stove from the Sabbath eve, either for a guest who was used to Sabbath tea or because everybody does that. At that moment, Isaac longed for two things, for a cup of tea and for a bed. Since they hadn't yet set the table, he went into his room and stretched out on his bed.

He found someone lying in his bed. Isaac took pity and didn't make him get up and was afraid to take another bed lest the owner of that bed would come and make him get out of it. The sleeping man woke with a start and looked around in alarm like a baby. Isaac, too, was scared that he had woken a sleeping man out of his sleep. That man said to Isaac, Is this your bed? My horse took sick and I went to get doctors and I was tired and lay down. Isaac recognized

-445-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Only Yesterday
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 652

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.