Only Yesterday

By S. Y. Agnon; Barbara Harshav | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FOUR
Leaves the Dog and Returns to Isaac

1

Whole in body and whole in spirit, Isaac returned to the Holy City. His soul, heavy when he left, was light when he returned. Sonya didn't complain about him and Rabinovitch didn't mention his transgression. On the contrary, he made him a partner in work and livelihood. Now all he had to do was go to Shifra's mother and ask her for her daughter's hand. The days Isaac had spent in Jaffa had expanded him, and he didn't see that he was an artisan and she was the daughter of important people, that he was from Galicia and she was from Hungary. Reb Fayesh's illness and the assistance Isaac had provided for Shifra and Rebecca also helped bring down the barriers. Even in the bad days, Isaac didn't despair, and now that his mood was good and his heart was open, there was even less reason.

The bare mountains roll and run with the train and sublime clouds are attached to them. And olive-green cliffs and rocks are suspended between the mountains and tend to fall but don't. And wild goats leap from cliff to cliff and from rock to rock, some raise their horns and look amazed, and with others, bunches of dirt roll away beneath their hooves and they don't make a sound. And a breeze goes among the mountains and refreshes a person's bones. Just this morning, deserts of sand were stumbling at your feet and the sea was roaring in front of you as far as the eye could see, and now solid mountains of the earth are on your right, and on your left a strip of blue is stretched above the mountains and a still small voice rises, and the mountains develop in silence, rise and fall, fall and rise, and the wheels of the train rattle below, and a big bird soars above and disappears in the blue of the sky or in the smoke rising from the train.

-507-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Only Yesterday
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 652

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.