Only Yesterday

By S. Y. Agnon; Barbara Harshav | Go to book overview

CHAPTER EIGHT
A Chapter unto Itself

1

That woodcarver was one of the remnants of artisans in Jerusalem, whose forefathers got fed up with the bread of idleness and learned to enjoy the labor of their hands. The people of Jerusalem saw their poverty and destitution, living in cramped and dreary apartments, and wearing tatters, and their children's only food was one dried fig in the morning and a slice of bread and oil fried with onion in the evening, and all day long they sit in Heder or in Yeshiva without food, while from all corners of the Diaspora crowds and crowds come because of the Distribution, and even at the beginning, the Distribution wasn't enough to provide one fourth of a person's needs. Discerning people started asking, How are the Children of Israel different from the Gentiles that live in the Land? For this Land wasn't given to their forefathers, and now they live in the Land as we do, and yet they make a living from the produce of the Land, while we are meager with poverty and shriveled with suffering. Is it not because of our sins that we eat the bread of sorrows, and no one raises a finger to improve his deeds? Some of them considered commerce and some considered working the land or finding a trade. But wherever a person turned, success turned away from him, for Jerusalem is solitary and forsaken and her events are meager and penurious. And these things are known, so there is no need to detail them.

Some philanthropists of the nation of the God of Abraham, led by the dignitary Reb Moses Montefiore, of blessed memory, saw the trouble of their brothers, and wanted to save them. They negotiated with the Sages and Rabbis of Jerusalem. There was a lot of advice and little action. A lot of money Montefiore invested in

-552-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Only Yesterday
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 652

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.