Foundations of Colonial America: A Documentary History - Vol. 3

By W. Keith Kavenagh | Go to book overview

ACTS OF PARLIAMENT
AND ROYAL PR OCLAMA TIONS

Introduction

The English government paid little attention to the first colonies planted in North America and had no formal policy regarding their administration or relations with the mother country. Early attempts at regulation were sporadic and confined to restrictions on the tobacco trade, conflicts between patentees and those who illegally fished in their waters or independently attempted to establish trade relations with the Indians, and efforts to regulate the flow of emigrants to the colonies. With the accession of Charles I, however, the Crown took an increasing interest in the colonies.

Concern over tobacco importations after 1618 and the dissolution of the Virginia Company in 1623 forced the Crown to pay more attention to events in North America. At that time there were but two permanent colonies in existence: Plymouth and Virginia. The former held its rights from the Council of New England and was of little concern to the Crown. The latter, however, had just become a royal colony and some mechanism had to be devised to administer it. The question of whether Parliament or the King would govern the colony was decided in favor of the latter after both James I and Charles I insisted that as a newly found or conquered territory it fell within the prerogatives of the sovereign. They supported their arguments by pointing out that the charter had been issued by the Crown and it was the Crown which had granted land titles and the rights of government. James I instructed

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Foundations of Colonial America: A Documentary History - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Foundations of Golonial America *
  • Preface v
  • Foundations of Colonial America *
  • Contents xi
  • Colonial Charters *
  • The Structure and Function of Government *
  • The Regulation of the Status and Activities of Individuals *
  • Taxation *
  • Regulation of Economic Activity *
  • Ecclesiastical Affairs *
  • Acts of Parliament and Royal Pr Oclama Tions *
  • Local Government *
  • Land Acquisition *
  • Laws Affecting Property Ownership *
  • Public and Private Records of Land Distribution Deeds, Grants, Patents *
  • Public and Private Records of Land Distribution: Wills and Estates *
  • Glossary *
  • Table of Regnal Years *
  • Bibliography *
  • Index *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 2639

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.