The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928

By Elizabeth Crawford | Go to book overview

A

ABADAM, ALICE (c. 1856-1940) Daughter of the High Sheriff of Carmarthen. She subscribed to the CENTRAL SOCIETY in 1905 and 1906-7. She signed, as an “Independent Socialist”, the joint WOMEN’S SOCIAL POLITICAL UNION/Independent Labour Party manifesto issued at the January 1906 general election, subscribed to the WSPU in 1906-7, and attended the banquet given at the Savoy on 11 December 1906 to celebrate the release of the WSPU prisoners. She left the WSPU in 1907 to become a member of the first committee of the WOMEN’S FREEDOM LEAGUE. However, by 1908 she appears to have left the militant wing of the suffrage movement to become the president of the Beckenham branch of the LONDON SOCIETY FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE and was president of the Norwood and District Women’s Suffrage Society in 1913.

Alice Abadam was a peripatetic speaker to a variety of suffrage societies. In 1908 she addressed, over the course of a fortnight, a series of “women only” meetings arranged by the BIRMINGHAM SOCIETY FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE (NUWSS) on the moral aspects of women’s suffrage and on 21 August was speaking for the NUWSS in Whitby. Votes for Women described her in its 13 January 1911 issue as “that well-known speaker on social subjects”. On that occasion she had been addressing the ACTRESSES’ FRANCHISE LEAGUE. The next week she was speaking at a meeting of the WOMEN WRITERS’ SUFFRAGE LEAGUE. She spoke to the MANSFIELD NUWSS in April 1909 and again in 1913 - on “How the Vote will affect the White Slave Traffic”. She spoke to the BEDFORD NUWSS in December 1912. She was a speaker for the CHURCH LEAGUE FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE after its formation in 1909, a supporter of the NEW CONSTITUTIONAL SOCIETY after it was founded in 1910, and was a prominent member and regular speaker for the CATHOLIC WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETY after its formation in 1911. On 29 June 1914 she was the hostess of one of the tables for the Costume Dinner organized by the Actresses’ Franchise League and the Women Writers’ Suffrage League held at the Hotel Cecil. Evelina HAVERFIELD was among those sitting at her table. By 1916 Miss Abadam was chairman of the FEDERATED COUNCIL OF SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES.

In a pamphlet, The Feminist Vote, Enfranchised or Emancipated?, published in 1918, she wrote “The Constructive Feminist has to be no man’s shadow. She must be herself - free to the very soul of sex servility. So, and only so, can she save a stricken world.” In later years she was chairman on the sub-committee on art in the University of Wales.

When she died Alice Abadam was living at Brynmyrddin, Abergwili, Carmarthenshire. She left most of her estate to her niece, Mary Edith Morris, and the remainder for “the education advancement” of a great-niece, Margaret Morris. One of the founders of the CARMARTHEN Women’s Suffrage Society in 1911 was Miss Morris of Brynmyrddin. The minutes of that society show that Miss Abadam was asked to speak at a meeting (but declined) and was to be held in reserve as president if the first choice refused.

Address: (1908) 97 Central Hill, Upper Norwood, London SE; (1940) 70 Hamilton Terrace, St John’s Wood, London N.

Photograph: by Edringtons Ltd, 29 Bold St, Liverpool issued as a postcard; in E. Hill and O.F. Shafer, Great Suffragists - and Why, 1909; in Fawcett Library Collection.

Bibliography: E. Hill and O.F. Shafer (eds), Great Suffragists - and Why, 1909.

ABBOTT, ELIZABETH, MRS (1883-1957) Born Wilhelmina Hay Lamond, in Scotland; she later adopted the name Elizabeth. She was educated at the City of London School for Girls, in Brussels, and at University College, London. Between 1903 and 1906 she trained as a secretary and accountant. In 1909 she became ORGANIZER for the EDINBURGH NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE, carrying out a suffrage campaign in the Highlands in August, and in 1910 became a member of the executive committee of the SCOTTISH FEDERATION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE. In 1910 she was also a member of the Scottish Committee that produced a Minority Report on Poor Law Reform. In 1911 she married George Frederick Abbott and became the mother of a son.

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The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations vi
  • Introduction ix
  • A 1
  • B 24
  • C 90
  • D 156
  • E 182
  • F 212
  • G 235
  • H 256
  • I 299
  • J 303
  • K 313
  • L 331
  • M 363
  • N 434
  • O 472
  • P 485
  • Q 585
  • R 586
  • S 613
  • T 671
  • U 693
  • V 697
  • W 699
  • Y 763
  • Z 766
  • Appendix - The Radical Liberal Family Networks 767
  • Acknowledgements 769
  • Archival Sources 771
  • Select Bibliography 774
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