The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928

By Elizabeth Crawford | Go to book overview

C

CAIRD, [ALICE] MONA HENRYSON, MRS (1854-1932) Feminist essayist and novelist, married James Henryson-Caird in 1877 and had one son, born in 1884. She subscribed to the CENTRAL COMMITTEE OF THE NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE in 1878. In the 1880s she attended meetings of Karl Pearson’s Men and Women’s Club, although she was never a formal member. In 1890 she was a member of the WOMEN’S FRANCHISE LEAGUE and Elizabeth Wolstenholme ELMY thought that Mona Caird certainly (and possibly her father-in-law Sir James Caird) would give drawing-room meetings for the League. Later that year, while wintering in Italy, Mona Caird gave Ben Elmy advice towards the writing of a paper, for private circulation only, on the “Physical Emancipation of Women”. In 1891, loyal to Elizabeth Wolstenholme Elmy, Mona Caird became a member of council of the WOMEN’S EMANCIPATION UNION and in that year an article by her on “The Position of Women”, published in the Manchester Guardian, 7 July, was reissued as the WEU’s second leaflet. In 1892 a paper by Mona Caird, “Why Women Want the Franchise”, was read at the Union’s conference in Birmingham. In 1904 she joined the Theosophical Society, resigning in 1909. In May 1906 Elizabeth Wolstenholme Elmy, while in London to take part in the WOMEN’S SOCIAL AND POLITICAL UNION deputation to Campbell-Bannerman, had lunch with Mona Caird and Frances ROWE. In October 1907 Mona Caird gave £20 to the WSPU, in November gave her support to its new paper, Votes for Women, and in June 1908 took part in the Hyde Park Demonstration. She was a member of the LONDON SOCIETY FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE from 1909 to 1913. Of her essays those that have most direct bearing on the suffrage issue are “A Defence of the Wild Women’”, Nineteenth Century, 1892; “Phases of Human Development”, Westminster Review, 1894; “Militant Tactics and Women’s Suffrage”, Westminster Review, 1910; “The Lot of Women”, Westminster Review, 1910. In 1888 an article by her, “Marriage”, published in the Westminster Review, caused a furore and sparked off a succession of “New Woman” essays and novels. A collection of her essays, comprising a very forceful attack on marriage, was published as The Morality of Marriage in 1907.

Address: (1896) 7 Kensington Court Gardens, London W; (1932) 34 Woronzow Road, St John’s Wood, London NW; Cassencary, near Creetown, Dumfries and Galloway.

Portrait: reproduced in A. Heilmann, “Mona Caird”, in Women’s History Review, 5, 1, 1996; a portrait of her by Millais (whose wife, Effie Gray, was aunt to Mona Caird’s husband) was shown at the Grosvenor Gallery, 1880.

Photograph: by H.S. Mendelssohn in the Review of Reviews, 10, 1894.

Bibliography: A. Heilmann, “Mona Caird”, Women’s History Review, 5, 1, 1996, which includes a complete bibliography of her work.

CAMBERLEY AND DISTRICT (NUWSS) In 1913 the society was a member of the SURREY, SUSSEX, AND HANTS FEDERATION OF THE NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES. Secretary (1913) Miss Evelyn Atkinson, Portesbery Hill, Camberley, Surrey.

CAMBERWELL (branch of the London Society, NUWSS) Secretary (1909) Mrs Dines, 3 Orchard House, County Grove, Camberwell, London SE; (1913) Mrs Harvey, 46, The Gardens, East Dulwich, London SE.

CAMBERWELL AND DULWICH (WFL) Secretary (1913) Nurse Evans, 404 Old Kent Road, London SE.

CAMBRIDGE (WSPU) Organizer (1913) Miss Olive BARTELS, 11 New Square, Cambridge.

CAMBRIDGE WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE ASSOCIATION Founded in 1884, and affiliated to the NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE. Its founding members included Mrs Anna BATESON, Mr Brambley, Mr B.E. Hammond, Mr Piggott, Mr Rae, Mr Roberts, Mr C. Turner, Mr Evelyn Shuckburgh, Miss Anna BATESON, Mrs Dale, Mrs FAWCETT, Mrs Peile (wife of the Master of Christ’s College), Mrs Tillyard, Miss Eliza Rhodes (the auditor of the CWSA’s accounts), Hon Mrs A.T. Lyttleton (wife of the Master of Selwyn College) and Dr Venn. The society’s first move was to ask the CENTRAL COMMITTEE OF THE NATIONAL SOCIETY how it should go about sending a petition to the House of Lords. In 1886 the CWSA supported the Woodall amendment, which excluded married women from the proposed franchise bill, while regretting the necessity for so doing. In March 1886 Miss Jeanette Wilkinson (a former upholsteress, now a peripatetic lecturer, who died later that year) gave a lecture to the society on the “Social and Political Position of Women”. One of the men members of the executive committee undertook to ask his friends at the Working Men’s Club to act as stewards for the occasion. Mrs Bateson was invited to ask a gentleman to act as chairman at the meeting. This appears to have been the convention; invariably the master of a college presided over the society’s annual general meeting.

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The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations vi
  • Introduction ix
  • A 1
  • B 24
  • C 90
  • D 156
  • E 182
  • F 212
  • G 235
  • H 256
  • I 299
  • J 303
  • K 313
  • L 331
  • M 363
  • N 434
  • O 472
  • P 485
  • Q 585
  • R 586
  • S 613
  • T 671
  • U 693
  • V 697
  • W 699
  • Y 763
  • Z 766
  • Appendix - The Radical Liberal Family Networks 767
  • Acknowledgements 769
  • Archival Sources 771
  • Select Bibliography 774
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