The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928

By Elizabeth Crawford | Go to book overview

E

EALING (WSPU) Secretary (1913) Mrs Finlay, 35 Warwick Road, Ealing, London W.

EALING, ACTON AND BEDFORD PARK (branch of the LONDON SOCIETY FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE) Secretary (1909) Mrs O’Regan, 18 Clovelly Road, Ealing, London W; (1913) Miss Debac, 37 Sandringham Gardens, Ealing, London W.

EARENGEY, FLORENCE, MRS (1877-1963) née How Sister of Edith How MARTYN, born in Kensington, a graduate of the University of London. Both she and Edith were married in Cheltenham in mid-1899. Florence married Dr William Earengey, who later became a judge, and by 1910 they had one daughter. In 1907 Florence Earengey was in charge of “literature” for the Cheltenham branch of the NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES. It would appear possible that she also subscribed to the WOMEN’S SOCIAL AND POLITICAL UNION in 1907. A “Mrs B.A. Earengey” is shown on the WSPU subscription list; no other Mrs Earengey features in the suffrage movement at any other time, and Florence, in those days when a woman graduate was a rare species, used to add “B.A.” after her name. Anyway, by 1908 she had, like her sister, joined the WOMEN’S FREEDOM LEAGUE and by 1911 was honorary secretary of its Cheltenham branch. Her husband in the next few years chaired meetings for the WFL Cheltenham branch, but by 1913 was president of the Tewkesbury branch of the NUWSS and was a member of the MEN’S LEAGUE FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE. In 1913 he wrote Woman Under the Law, which was published by the WFL. Florence Earengey eventually became a barrister, practising from the Temple, and a JP. In the 1930s she was chairman of Holloway Visiting Justices and chairman of Holloway Discharged Prisoners’ Aid Society (London) Committee. In 1949 she wrote The Legal and Economic Status of Women, which was published by the National Council of Women.

Address: (1907) 3 Wellington Square, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire; (1913) Ashley Rise, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire; (1938) 1 Chesterford Gardens, Hampstead, London NW3; (1963) Ashley Rise, Brackendale Road, Camberley, Surrey.

Photograph: in the Vote, 7 May, 1910 - weighing her baby.

EAST DEREHAM branch of the NEW CONSTITUTIONAL SOCIETY FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE Honorary secretary (1913) Violet Cory, Market Place, Dereham, Norfolk.

EAST GRINSTEAD branch of the MEN’S LEAGUE FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE Founded in 1912.

EAST GRINSTEAD (NUWSS) In 1913 the society was a member of the SURREY, SUSSEX, AND HANTS FEDERATION OF THE NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES. Secretary (1913) Mrs CORBETT, Woodgate, Danehill, Sussex.

EAST LONDON FEDERATION OF SUFFRAGETTES Had its origins in the campaign undertaken in the East End of London in 1912 by Sylvia PANKHURST. This campaign represented Sylvia Pankhurst’s reaction to the calls frequently made by Asquith, Herbert Gladstone, and most forcefully by C.E. Hobhouse in February 1912 for the women’s movement to give proof that women wanted their own enfranchisement. Whereas Christabel PANKHURST had reacted by instituting a policy of militant damage and Emmeline PANKHURST by courting a charge of sedition, Sylvia Pankhurst “regarded that the rousing of the East End was of utmost importance”. She felt that only a mass movement could bring presssure to bear on parliament and, as she explained in The Suffragette Movement, “the East End was the greatest homogeneous working-class area accessible to the House of Commons by popular demonstrations”. She had, that summer, convinced local WOMEN’S SOCIAL AND POLITICAL UNION branches in London to hold large popular demonstrations in London’s parks and open spaces - such as Wimbledon, Clapham and Streatham commons, Peckham Rye and Regent’s Park - culminating in a mass demonstration in Hyde Park on 14 July, happily, by coincidence, the anniversary of both the fall of the Bastille and the birth of Emmeline Pankhurst.

-182-

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The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations vi
  • Introduction ix
  • A 1
  • B 24
  • C 90
  • D 156
  • E 182
  • F 212
  • G 235
  • H 256
  • I 299
  • J 303
  • K 313
  • L 331
  • M 363
  • N 434
  • O 472
  • P 485
  • Q 585
  • R 586
  • S 613
  • T 671
  • U 693
  • V 697
  • W 699
  • Y 763
  • Z 766
  • Appendix - The Radical Liberal Family Networks 767
  • Acknowledgements 769
  • Archival Sources 771
  • Select Bibliography 774
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