The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928

By Elizabeth Crawford | Go to book overview

F

FABIAN WOMEN’S GROUP Founded in 1908; the “Provisional Committee of the Fabian Women’s Group Suffrage Section” met for the first time on 19 October 1911. Mabel ATKINSON was appointed chairman, Elspeth Carr, treasurer, and Miss Berry, secretary. The Suffrage Section was established in order to lobby Labour MPs, asking them to support the Conciliation Bill as the only practical means of obtaining for women full practical rights and of securing, in the future, adult and not merely manhood suffrage. The Committee invited co-operation and subscriptions from men members of the Fabian Society and remained neutral on the subject of militant tactics. Members of the Suffrage Section intended to concentrate on the constituencies of Deptford and Greenwich, but the intention was to employ a paid ORGANIZER for those in Wales, the Midlands and Yorkshire. H.N. BRAILSFORD recommended Annot ROBINSON as a potential organizer (her quoted fee was £2 2s a week plus expenses). Mabel Atkinson and Elspeth Carr undertook to arrange work in Newcastle and West Durham. By February 1913 the Section was deploring what it considered the anti-suffrage conspiracy that resulted in the withdrawal of the Franchise Bill and calling on the Labour party to put pressure on the government by opposing any extension or alteration of the franchise that did not include women.

In May 1913 the Section joined the WOMEN’S SOCIAL AND POLITICAL UNION in a demonstration in Victoria Park in Hackney. The last meeting of the Section before the war was held in March 1914; it was decided that in view of the political situation it was not possible for the Section to take any particular action and to wait and see what happened. It was agreed at a meeting in January 1917 that the Section should affiliate to the National Council for Adult Suffrage and disband its own work.

Archival source: Fabian Society Archive, London School of Economics and Political Science.

FAHEY, [CHARLOTTE EMILY] CAPRINA, MRS (c. 1883-still alive 1933) (later Mrs Knight) Daughter of Alfred Gilbert, RA, the sculptor of the statue of Eros in Piccadilly Circus, of the memorial in Westminster Abbey to Henry Fawcett (see Millicent Garrett FAWCETT), and, incidentally, of the statue of John Howard in the Market Place in Bedford at the base of which Dora MASON and other members of the BEDFORD SOCIETY FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE were attacked by a mob while holding a meeting in June 1913. Caprina Gilbert married Alfred Edward Fahey, a painter, in 1901 and in 1905 had a son. Her husband died in 1907. She was a trained masseuse (“Attendance at Ladies’ own Homes, from 5s per Visit”) and joined the WOMEN’S SOCIAL AND POLITICAL UNION at the Hyde Park Demonstration in June 1908. In 1908 she shared an address with Vera WENTWORTH. They lived in the house of Robert Wyatt and on 12 November 1908 a drawing-room meeting for the WSPU was held there “at Mrs Wyatt’s kind invitation”. Mrs Wyatt in 1911 was the honorary WSPU organizer for Hendon and Golders Green. Caprina Fahey took part in the deputation from the Women’s Parliament in Caxton Hall to the Houses of Parliament on 24 February 1909 and was arrested and received one month’s imprisonment. In September she was in correspondence with Helen WATTS with whom she had been in Holloway.

For the January 1910 general election Caprina Fahey was the WSPU organizer for the Middlesex (Harrow) Parliamentary Division. In November 1910 she was sentenced to two weeks’ imprisonment for stone throwing following the “Black Friday” demonstration. In June 1913 she was one of the “group captains” at the funeral of Emily Wilding DAVISON. Sir Alfred Gilbert made no mention of his daughter, or her son, in his will.

Address: (1908) Derby House, Parson Street, Hendon; (1911) working as a masseuse from 18 New Street, Dorset Square, London NW.

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The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations vi
  • Introduction ix
  • A 1
  • B 24
  • C 90
  • D 156
  • E 182
  • F 212
  • G 235
  • H 256
  • I 299
  • J 303
  • K 313
  • L 331
  • M 363
  • N 434
  • O 472
  • P 485
  • Q 585
  • R 586
  • S 613
  • T 671
  • U 693
  • V 697
  • W 699
  • Y 763
  • Z 766
  • Appendix - The Radical Liberal Family Networks 767
  • Acknowledgements 769
  • Archival Sources 771
  • Select Bibliography 774
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