The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928

By Elizabeth Crawford | Go to book overview

G

GALASHIELS (NUWSS) In 1913 the society was a member of the SCOTTISH FEDERATION OF THE NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES. Secretary (1913) Miss Jessie Tod, 187 Magdala Terrace, Galashiels, Selkirk.

GALLOWAY branch of the National Society for Women’s Suffrage Founded in 1870. Secretary (1872) Miss Dalziel, Glenluce, Wigtonshire. The Galloway society associated itself with the new CENTRAL COMMITTEE OF THE NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE in 1872.

GAMES AND TOYS The translation of the mechanics of the women’s suffrage campaign into board and card games was a masterstroke that originated from within the WOMEN’S SOCIAL AND POLITICAL UNION. Not only were funds raised, but the message of the cause was brought into domestic circles where more rabid propaganda might not have been welcomed. Novelty manufacturers clearly thought that the campaign had commercial appeal, launching several games to rival those of the WSPU. There is no evidence that donations were made from their profits to any of the suffrage societies. The many bazaars organized by the WSPU and the WOMEN’S FREEDOM LEAGUE attracted donations from members of dolls attired in suffragette costume. In December 1908 the Manchester Doll Show could boast a “Suffragette Exhibit”; there is no evidence that commercial manufacturers produced such consciousness-raising items. Rather, as with CHINA, FILM and POSTCARDS, “novelty” toys equalled “comic”. Still extant are such novelties as a chess set which pits suffragettes against policemen, and a jack-in-the-box springing a “fright” of a caricature suffragette, but it is not clear if these were the result of commercial manufacture or one-off productions by amateurs. There are doubtless more such toys and games awaiting discovery. The following games were known to have been marketed.

SUFFRAGETTE, a card game invented by the KENSINGTON branch of the WSPU, probably in the late summer of 1907. The game is described in Votes for Women, November 1907.

RUSHING THE HOUSE, “Illustrating an Historical Event. An amusing game for young and old”, Novelty Co., 6 High Street, Hampstead. It was launched in 1908, possibly in time for Christmas, inspired by the events of that October, when Christabel PANKHURST was charged with inciting onlookers to “Rush the House of Commons”.

“HOLLOWAY”, or VOTES FOR WOMEN. This appears to have been issued by November 1908 and to be a slighly more complicated version of “Panko”. THE LADIES PUZZLE, also known as THE SUFFRAGETTE PUZZLE, “To get the Women’s Suffrage Bill through the Houses of Parliament”, F.H. Ayres Ltd, 111 Aldersgate Street, London, launched in 1908. An advertisement for it ran, “buy the suffragette puzzle and see how it can be done”.

PANK-A-SQUITH, a board game, first advertised in Votes for Women, 22 October 1909. Mary BLATHWAYT bought the game in December 1909. She and Annie KENNEY played “Pank-a-squith” and the card game “Panko” to pass an anxious time while Jennie Kenney was being operated on at Eagle House, Batheaston, in July 1910.

PANKO, a card game, launched by Messrs Peter Gurney Ltd. The cards were designed by E.T. Reed, a Punch cartoonist. The game is first mentioned in Votes for Women, 10 December 1909. The advertisement for the game claimed, “Not only is each picture in itself an interesting memento, but the game produces intense excitement without the slightest taint of bitterness.” Mary BLATHWAYT gave a set of “Panko” to her mother for Christmas 1909.

SUFFRAGETTO, “an original and interesting game of skill for two players”, available by May 1909. The game was played with a squared board and coloured pieces. “The object of the Suffragette is to pass through the lines of the Police and to effect an entry into the House of Commons: and while doing so to prevent the Police from entering Albert Hall. The duty of the Police is to break up a meeting of the Suffragettes which is being held in Albert Hall, and to keep the Suffragettes out of the House of Commons”.

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The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations vi
  • Introduction ix
  • A 1
  • B 24
  • C 90
  • D 156
  • E 182
  • F 212
  • G 235
  • H 256
  • I 299
  • J 303
  • K 313
  • L 331
  • M 363
  • N 434
  • O 472
  • P 485
  • Q 585
  • R 586
  • S 613
  • T 671
  • U 693
  • V 697
  • W 699
  • Y 763
  • Z 766
  • Appendix - The Radical Liberal Family Networks 767
  • Acknowledgements 769
  • Archival Sources 771
  • Select Bibliography 774
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