The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928

By Elizabeth Crawford | Go to book overview

H

HACKNEY (WFL) Secretary (1913) Mrs Pierotti, 31 Walsingham Road, Clapton, London E.

HACKNEY (WSPU) Secretary (1906) Miss R. Scriven, 131 Homeleigh Road, Stamford Hill, London N; (1913) Mrs Jones, 39 Pembury Road, Clapton, London, E.

HACKNEY (NORTH) (branch of the LONDON SOCIETY FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE, NUWSS) Secretary (1909) Mrs Croft Handley, 154 Stoke Newington Road, London N; (1913) Miss I. Hancock, BA, 85 Digby Road, Green Lanes, London N.

HACKNEY (SOUTH) (branch of the LONDON SOCIETY FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE) Secretary (1909) Mrs Elliott, 37 St Thomas’ Road, South Hackney, London E.

HADDINGTON committee of the NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE In existence in 1872 when its honorary secretary was Miss Rachel Brown. In 1913 the society was a member of the SCOTTISH FEDERATION OF THE NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES. Secretary (1913) Miss Jennie Riddell, Oaklands, Haddington, Lothian.

HADLEIGH (WFL) Secretary (1913) Miss Matthews, 21 Fir Tree Terrace, Hadleigh, Suffolk.

HAIG, CECILIA WOLSELEY (c. 1862-1912) From Berwickshire, Scotland, sister of Evelyn and Florence HAIG and cousin of Margaret Thomas, later Lady RHONDDA. Her parents were both in favour of women’s suffrage. She spent many years involved in social work and in 1898 was a member of the Edinburgh Ladies’ Debating Society. She was a member of the CENTRAL NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE from 1892 until 1899. Cecilia Haig was influenced to join the WOMEN’S SOCIAL AND POLITICAL UNION by the example of her sister, Florence, and was also a member of the TAX RESISTANCE LEAGUE, of the CHURCH LEAGUE FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE, and gave a donation to the MEN’S POLITICAL UNION in 1911. In November 1911 she was severely assaulted and trampled on during the “Black Friday” debacle in Parliament Square. She died just a year afterwards, having been nursed in her illness by Florence Haig. A writer in Votes for Women, 5 January 1912, had no hesitation in blaming the treatment she received on “Black Friday” as the reason for her death. On 14 January 1912 Annie KENNEY planted a tree in her memory in the Blathwayts’ arboretum at Eagle House, Batheaston.

Address: (1895) 87 Comely Bank Avenue, Edinburgh.

HAIG, (LOUISA) EVELYN COTTON (1863-1954) Born in Edinburgh, sister of Cecilia and Florence HAIG and cousin of Margaret Thomas, later Lady RHONDDA. She was an artist, specializing in miniatures, studied in Paris and exhibited at the Paris Salon and at the Royal Academy. She was a member of the Edinburgh Ladies’ Debating Society in 1901. She was brought into the women’s suffrage movement by her sister Florence, subscribed to the WOMEN’S SOCIAL AND POLITICAL UNION in 1907 and was one of the founding members in 1908 of the Edinburgh WSPU. She took part in the “Black Friday” demonstration in 1910 during which her sister, Cecilia, was injured, and in January 1913 was arrested, charged with obstruction and sentenced to one month’s imprisonment after taking part in the protest outside the House of Commons against the withdrawal of the Franchise Bill after the Speaker had ruled that amendments to include women would necessitate a new bill. She served the whole sentence.

Address: (1901) 87 Comely Bank Avenue, Edinburgh.

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The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations vi
  • Introduction ix
  • A 1
  • B 24
  • C 90
  • D 156
  • E 182
  • F 212
  • G 235
  • H 256
  • I 299
  • J 303
  • K 313
  • L 331
  • M 363
  • N 434
  • O 472
  • P 485
  • Q 585
  • R 586
  • S 613
  • T 671
  • U 693
  • V 697
  • W 699
  • Y 763
  • Z 766
  • Appendix - The Radical Liberal Family Networks 767
  • Acknowledgements 769
  • Archival Sources 771
  • Select Bibliography 774
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