The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928

By Elizabeth Crawford | Go to book overview

I

ILFORD (WSPU) Secretary (1913) Miss HASLAM, 68 Cranbrook Road, Ilford, Essex. The banner of the Ilford WSPU is now in the National Museum of Labour History, Manchester.

ILFRACOMBE (WSPU) Secretary (1910) Mrs Du Sautoy Newby, St Mary’s, Broad Park Avenue, Ilfracombe, Devonshire.

ILKESTON (NUWSS) In 1913 the society was a member of the MIDLANDS (EAST) FEDERATION OF THE NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES. Secretary (1913) Miss N.C. Hague, 12 Drummond Road, Ilkeston, Derbyshire.

ILLINGWORTH, MARGARET HOLDEN, MRS (1842- 1919) Born in Yorkshire, the daughter of Sir Isaac Holden, married in 1866 to Alfred Illingworth, mother of six sons. By 1895 she was a member of the WOMEN’S FRANCHISE LEAGUE and in November 1896 sent £20 to the WOMEN’S EMANCIPATION UNION. In a letter to Harriet MCILQUHAM, who had solicited the gift, Elizabeth Wolstenholme ELMY rather grudgingly comments on this generosity, “and she is rich enough for one not to feel that one is in any way hurting her”. In 1899 Elizabeth Wolstenholme Elmy wrote that she had very much enjoyed meeting Mrs Illingworth and reported to Harriet McIlquham that she was “anxious to interest her more actively than hitherto in the woman question, as she is rich, intelligent, and kind hearted. She is quite able, if we could only stir her up to the point, to do great things financially for the woman’s cause, since I suppose she has somewhat over half a million at her own disposal.” She added that, rather to her surprise, Mr Illingworth, “though a stout Radical”, was not in favour of the enfranchisement of married women. He had supported the Married Women’s Property Act and it had made a very substantial change to his wife’s financial position, presumably not to his own benefit. In 1910 Mrs Illingworth was, not surprisingly, a supporter of the TAX RESISTANCE LEAGUE. By 1913 she was president of the BRADFORD WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETY and a vice-president of both the NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES and the LONDON SOCIETY FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE.

Address: (1913) Daisy Bank, Bradford, Yorkshire; Queen Anne’s Mansions, St James’s Park, London SW1.

Archival source: Elizabeth Wolstenholme Elmy Papers, British Library.

INDEPENDENT WSPU Was, like the SUFFRAGETTES OF THE WSPU, a group that during the First World War broke away from the WOMEN’S SOCIAL AND POLITICAL UNION, which, although still led by Emmeline and Christabel PANKHURST, no longer addressed itself to the suffrage issue. The new society was formed on 21 March 1916 with Charlotte MARSH as its honorary secretary, Gladys SCHÜTZE its honorary treasurer, Dorothea ROCK its assistant honorary secretary and Dorothy EVANS its honorary provincial organizer. The group was represented in Preston by Edith RIGBY and in Glasgow by Janet Barrowman. Zoe PROCTER was a member. In 1916 and 1917 the group issued a paper, the Independent Suffragette.

Address: (1917) 30 Chester Terrace, Chelsea, London SW; (1918) 3 Duke Street, Adelphi, London WC2 (address of the International Suffrage Shop - see SHOPS).

INGLIS, ELSIE MAUD (1864-1917) Born in India, with her family settled in Edinburgh in 1875, was educated there and in Paris and then trained to be a doctor at Sophia Jex-Blake’s Edinburgh School of Medicine for Women. In 1889, after disagreements with Dr Jex-Blake, Elsie Inglis, backed by her father and his influential friends, opened a rival medical school, the Scottish Association for the Medical Education for Women, where she herself continued her training, completing it first in Glasgow and then at the New Hospital for Women, opened by Elizabeth Garrett ANDERSON in 1890 in the Euston Road in London. Elsie Inglis had signed the Declaration in Favour of Women’s Suffrage compiled by the CENTRAL COMMITTEE OF THE NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE in 1889, but it was when she moved to London to take up position as house-surgeon in 1892 that she became an active suffrage worker, her first action being to obtain a sheet of signatures for a vote of thanks to MPs who had voted for the Rollit Suffrage Bill in 1892. Elsie Inglis was a supporter of Gladstone’s policy of home rule for Ireland, and was a member of the WOMEN’S LIBERAL FEDERATION, although disagreeing with any suggestion that party should be placed before the principle of women’s enfranchisement. Soon after Elsie Inglis’s arrival in London Elizabeth Wolstenholme ELMY asked her to write an article on women’s medical education. Being so recently qualified, Elsie Inglis felt unable to accept the invitation, but when Mrs Wolstenholme Elmy then asked her to speak at a drawing-room meeting on women’s suffrage, she felt obliged to accept. Elsie Inglis’s suffrage debut was a success and Elizabeth Wolstenholme Elmy described her in a letter to Harriet MCILQUHAM as “very sweet and charming”.

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The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations vi
  • Introduction ix
  • A 1
  • B 24
  • C 90
  • D 156
  • E 182
  • F 212
  • G 235
  • H 256
  • I 299
  • J 303
  • K 313
  • L 331
  • M 363
  • N 434
  • O 472
  • P 485
  • Q 585
  • R 586
  • S 613
  • T 671
  • U 693
  • V 697
  • W 699
  • Y 763
  • Z 766
  • Appendix - The Radical Liberal Family Networks 767
  • Acknowledgements 769
  • Archival Sources 771
  • Select Bibliography 774
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