The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928

By Elizabeth Crawford | Go to book overview

J

JACK, ALEXIA BUTTER (1863-1949) A teacher, she was first a pupil-teacher in Aberdeen before going to work and live in Edinbugh. By 1913 she held the position of “second master” in an elementary school, one of only three women to have achieved this level of promotion in Edinburgh. In 1907 she became the first honorary secretary of the Edinburgh branch of the WOMEN’S FREEDOM LEAGUE, remaining in that post certainly until 1915. She was also honorary secretary and treasurer of the Scottish Council of the WFL and was a Scottish representative on the national executive of the WFL in 1912. During the First World War, under the aegis of the WFL she worked to look after the interests of women engaged in agriculture until in 1915 she suffered a breakdown in health. After the partial enfranchisement of women in 1918 Alexia Jack became the first honorary secretary and a vice-president of the Edinburgh Women Citizens’ Association. In her will, among other charitable bequests, she left £100 to the Edinburgh Women Citizens’ Association, £100 to the WFL, and £100 to the Scottish Council of Women Citizens.

Address: (1908) 4 Fountainhall Road, Edinburgh; (1949) 46 Great King Street, Edinburgh.

Bibliography: L. Leneman, A Guid Cause: The Women’s Suffrage Movement in Scotland, 1991.

JAMIESON, CHRISTINA (c. 1864-1942) Born at Cruisdale, Sandness, Shetland, the second child and elder daughter of Robert Jamieson, the local schoolmaster. After the death of her father, at the turn of the century the family moved to Lerwick. Christina Jamieson contributed articles to the People’s Journal, the Scotsman and the Weekly Scotsman. As her obituarist in the Shetland News, 4 June 1942, recorded, “Keenly interested in public affairs, she could not abide the inferior position in their conduct accorded in her time to women” and in order to help change this state of affairs she founded and became secretary of the SHETLAND SUFFRAGE SOCIETY, a member of the NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES. She was the co-designer of the Orkney and Shetland BANNER and carried it in the suffrage Coronation procession in London on 21 June 1911. In 1909 she published, as Sketch of Votes for Women Movement, a brief history of the women’s suffrage cause, the text of which she had delivered as a lecture to a packed meeting of the Lerwick Literary and Debating Society. A radical in politics, Christina Jamieson invited Ethel SNOWDEN to Lerwick to persuade Shetlanders of the justness of the case for women’s suffrage. In 1916 Christina Jamieson was elected to the Lerwick School Board, the first woman to serve on any public body in Shetland. In 1935 she emigrated to New Zealand to spend her final years with one of her brothers.

Address: Twagios, Lerwick, Shetland.

JARROW (NUWSS) In 1913 the society was a member of the NORTH-EASTERN FEDERATION OF THE NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES. Secretary (1913) Miss Isabel Fletcher, Oaklands, Jarrow-on-Tyne, Co. Durham.

JEFFERY, GABRIELLE VIOLET (1886-1940) Born in Devon, she joined the WOMEN’S SOCIAL AND POLITICAL UNION in 1909. Mary BLATHWAYT noted in her diary that Gabrielle Jeffery arrived in Newport from Bristol on 6 September 1909 in order to be WSPU ORGANIZER there. Gabrielle Jeffery still held this position there in early 1910 and then in June, at Kensington Town Hall, founded the CATHOLIC WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETY (which later became St Joan’s Social and Political Alliance).

Address: (1913) 55 Berners Street, London W1; (1940) 5 Holly Place, Hampstead, London NW.

JEWELLERY AND BADGES At the end of the nineteenth century the concept of a badge to identify the wearer with a political campaign was not novel. Apart from those mentioned in the ditty below, in the 1840s the Anti-Corn Law League had produced a “Corn Law ribbon”, which featured a wheatear pattern, and in 1889 a “Home Rule badge”, sporting the profile of Gladstone, was advertised “for sleeve-links or button-hole”. However, Laura Morgan-BROWNE’s “Franchise Ballad III”, published in the Woman’s Herald, 20 February 1892, suggested for the first time the attraction of a badge for suffrage campaigners. The first verse runs:

-303-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations vi
  • Introduction ix
  • A 1
  • B 24
  • C 90
  • D 156
  • E 182
  • F 212
  • G 235
  • H 256
  • I 299
  • J 303
  • K 313
  • L 331
  • M 363
  • N 434
  • O 472
  • P 485
  • Q 585
  • R 586
  • S 613
  • T 671
  • U 693
  • V 697
  • W 699
  • Y 763
  • Z 766
  • Appendix - The Radical Liberal Family Networks 767
  • Acknowledgements 769
  • Archival Sources 771
  • Select Bibliography 774
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 786

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.