The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928

By Elizabeth Crawford | Go to book overview

K

KEEVIL, [GEORGINA] GLADICE (1884-1959) (later Mrs Rickford) Educated at the Frances Mary Buss School in Camden and then at Lambeth Art School. She worked as a governess for 18 months in France and the United States and on her return to England joined the WOMEN’S SOCIAL AND POLITICAL UNION, donating 1/- in September 1907. In February 1908 Gladice Keevil was one of the women arrested, with Mrs PANKHURST, as they took part in the protest against the imprisonment of the deputation from the “Women’s Parliament” in Caxton Hall to the House of Commons. She then spent six weeks in Holloway and after her release was appointed a WSPU ORGANIZER and entrusted with a platform at the Hyde Park “Women’s Sunday” rally on 21 June. The Daily News singled her out, reporting that “Miss Keevil was a particularly striking figure. Robed in flowing white muslin, her lithe figure swayed to every changing expression, and the animated face that smiled and scolded by turns beneath the black straw hat and waving white ostrich feather, was the centre of one of the densest crowds”. In September 1908 she was appointed National Organizer of the Midlands, setting up a new regional office in Birmingham. She remained there until the end of 1909 when she left to organize the WSPU general election campaign in Exeter. She returned to the Midlands, where she had been succeeded by Dorothy EVANS, for a short time in February 1910. She visited Batheaston in the course of the year and Mrs BLATHWAYT noted that she was “a very nice girl . . . I taught her to crochet the shawls I make as she took a fancy to them”. She was then a speaker in the summer campaign that year in Ireland. A member of the audience at an open-air meeting in Queen’s Park, Belfast at the end of August or beginning of September sent a postcard photograph of Gladice Keevil to a friend saying, “Clever speaker and knows her subject”. After that she disappears from the scene; a newspaper report in 1912 suggests that she had been on a long sea voyage after a breakdown in health. By 28 November 1912 she was back, chairing a WSPU meeting for Mrs Pankhurst. She married in Hendon in September 1913 and became the mother of three sons.

Address: (1959) The Wall Cottage, Burpham, Arundel, Sussex.

Photograph: by Col Blathwayt in B.M. Willmott Dobbie, A Nest of Suffragettes in Somerset, 1979.

KEIGHLEY (WSPU) Secretary (1906) Miss Minnie Glyde, 6 Bronte Street, Keighley, Yorkshire.

KEITH, Banffshire, committee of the NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE Was in existence in 1872 when its convenor was Rev. Mr Nairn.

KELSO (NUWSS) In 1913 the society was a member of the SCOTTISH FEDERATION OF THE NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES. Secretary (1913) Mrs Fleming, Abbey Row, Kelso, Roxburghshire.

KENDAL AND DISTRICT (NUWSS) In 1913 the society was a member of the NORTH-WESTERN FEDERATION OF THE NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES. Secretary (1913) Miss Harrison, Hill Cote, Kendal, Westmorland.

KENNEY, [ANN] ANNIE (1879-1953) (later Mrs Taylor) Fifth of 11 children of Ann (née Wood) and Horatio Kenney, born at Springhead, Saddleworth, in Lancashire. Annie Kenney began work as a half-timer at the local mill at the age of ten. Teresa BILLINGTON-GRIEG later wrote that “at one time the propagandists of the [suffrage] movement made much publicity on ‘Annie Kenney, The Suffragette Mill Girl’ lines which she deeply disliked. Yet she bore it with patience for many years. I always believed she was right to object, for it presented her origin in a false aspect. Her factory work was a very temporary affair when like many families of those days, circumstances depressed them into poverty, but the Kenney family came from a home where there was a basis of culture and the ideals of a cultivated life, and in addition to Annie herself the stock bred daughters and sons of outstanding ability”. Of the family, besides Annie, three of her sisters, Jessie, Jane (Jenny) and Nell were involved with the WSPU. Jenny and another sister, Kitty, were later trained as teachers by Maria Montessori, and after the First World War opened a school outside New York teaching, for instance, Caruso’s daughter. Of her two brothers one became a business man in Manchester and the other, Rowland (b. 1882), was the first editor of the Daily Herald in 1912, a Guild Socialist during the war, Reuter’s correspondent in Oslo, 1917-18, “the only genuine working-man ever to get into the Foreign Office” (Margaret Cole in Growing Up Into Revolution), 1920- 38, press attaché in Oslo, 1939-40, and adviser to the Royal Norwegian government in London, 1941-5. He took a view of the WOMEN’S SOCIAL AND POLITICAL UNION very different to that of his sisters. He held to the Labour principles of their youth and in December 1912 wrote an article, “Women’s Suffrage: the militant movement in ruins”, for the English Review, in which he claimed that the movement’s downfall was due to its having lost touch with its original supporters and to its wooing of the middle- and upper-class women in order to swell the WSPU’s funds. He wrote that in mills and workshops “you will find that the subject [the suffrage] bores them, or is merely a peg for jokes. They have noted the spectacular side of the movement, they have apprehended the clever advertising which has carried it along, but they detect no warm spirit of appreciation and understanding of their own lives and difficulties in its present propaganda.” Gail Braybon in Women Workers of the First World War, 1981, although making no connection with his sister, noted Rowland Kenney’s writing in the New Age as being “peculiarly anti-feminist”. He and his sisters were part of a family that discussed Spencer, Darwin and Haeckel around the tea table. Annie Kenney’s husband, when interviewed in 1974, also stressed the extraordinary breadth and depth of the education received within the Kenney family. Annie Kenney recorded how, soon after her confirmation by the Bishop of Manchester, she was reading Voltaire in the Oldham Public Library.

-313-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations vi
  • Introduction ix
  • A 1
  • B 24
  • C 90
  • D 156
  • E 182
  • F 212
  • G 235
  • H 256
  • I 299
  • J 303
  • K 313
  • L 331
  • M 363
  • N 434
  • O 472
  • P 485
  • Q 585
  • R 586
  • S 613
  • T 671
  • U 693
  • V 697
  • W 699
  • Y 763
  • Z 766
  • Appendix - The Radical Liberal Family Networks 767
  • Acknowledgements 769
  • Archival Sources 771
  • Select Bibliography 774
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 786

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.