The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928

By Elizabeth Crawford | Go to book overview

M

MACAULAY, FLORENCE ELIZABETH MARY (1862-1945) Daughter of a Reading bookseller, she went to SOMERVILLE COLLEGE, Oxford, on a Samuel Morley Exhibition only to have to leave after two terms, her father having died. Her first teaching post on leaving was at Miss Buckland’s School in Reading. She was subsequently a teacher at St John School, Hamilton Place in St John’s Wood in London (at a salary of £60 a year with board and lodging), and in 1887 became assistant mistress at the Orphanage of Mercy at Kilburn. In 1886 she returned to Somerville on a further exhibition of £25, but was obliged to leave after a term, having exhausted her funds. She taught for the next 20 years, including a period of six years at Great Yarmouth High School. By 26 February 1907, when she addressed a meeting of the Canning Town branch, she was a member of the WOMEN’S SOCIAL AND POLITICAL UNION and became one of its peripatetic ORGANIZERS. She was speaking for the WSPU in Brighton in 1907, in Bristol in October 1908 and in the Midlands in January 1909. She was WSPU organizer in Edinburgh for much of 1909. From February 1910 until late 1912 Florence Macaulay was organizer in Canterbury and Thanet and in 1913 was addressing meetings in Scotland. In 1913 she was present on the platform at the meeting at the Essex Hall, London, which resulted in the arrest of Annie KENNEY for incitement to riot. In 1909 F.E.M. Macaulay was the author of “The Women’s Marseillaise”, “Arise, ye daughters of a land/ That vaunts its liberty!”, a marching SONG published by the WSPU.

Address: (1910) “Trevarra”, 30 Bouverie Road West, Folkestone; (1945) 38 Howard Road, Newbury, Berkshire.

MACCLESFIELD Had a branch of the MEN’S LEAGUE FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE; its BANNER is now held in the Manchester Central Library Archives.

MACCLESFIELD (NUWSS) Founded in 1908, in 1910 the society joined the MANCHESTER AND DISTRICT FEDERATION OF THE NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES. Secretary (1913) Miss Annie Ryle Wright, Upton Mount, Macclesfield, Cheshire. The society’s BANNER, which was probably designed by Mary LOWNDES, is now in Manchester Central Library Archives.

MACCLESFIELD Had a branch of the UNITED SUFFRAGISTS; its BANNER is now held in Manchester Central Library Archives.

MACMILLAN, [JESSIE] CHRYSTAL (1871-1937) Born in Edinburgh, the only daughter, with eight brothers, of a stockbroker. She was educated in Edinburgh and at St Leonards School, St Andrews. Having rejected a preferred scholarship at Girton, Chrystal MacMillan matriculated at Edinburgh University in 1892, the first year in which it was open to women, and in 1896 took a first-class degree in Mathematics and Natural Philosophy and in 1900 a second-class MA in Mental and Moral Philosophy. She attended Berlin University for a period in 1900. In 1902 she was a member of the Edinburgh Ladies’ Debating Society, in 1908 seconding a proposal in support of uncontributory old-age pensions. She became honorary secretary and treasurer of the Committee of Women Graduates of the Scottish Universities (Parliamentary Franchise) when it was formed in 1906. Chrystal MacMillan, Elsie INGLIS, Frances Simson, Frances Melville and Margaret Nairn, all graduates and full members of the General Council of Edinburgh University, were refused voting papers for the University seat at the election and attempted to bring an action against the University Courts and the Chancellors, Vice-Chancellors and Registrars. They argued that the universities had no legal right to withold their voting papers and that the 1868 act specified “person” rather than “man”. Chrystal MacMillan wrote to Elizabeth Wolstenholme ELMY on 9 March 1906 asking her, as the author of the pamphlet The Enfranchisement of Women, if she could help by giving information on the ancient rights of women. She ended her request by writing, “I formed my beliefs on your pamphlet”. Elizabeth Wolstenhome Elmy gave her all the help she could and also advised her to approach Charlotte Carmichael STOPES. In 1907 the case was lost and an appeal was brought, which confirmed the finding of the lower court. Undeterred, the Committee determined to take the case to the House of Lords, raising the £1000 necessary to do so. Chrystal MacMillan, backed by Frances Simson, appeared at the bar of the House of Lords in November 1908. By arguing the case through the whole gamut of the justice system she and her fellow graduates hoped to draw attention to women’s capabilities and highlight the absurdity of denying the vote to such women as themselves.

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The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations vi
  • Introduction ix
  • A 1
  • B 24
  • C 90
  • D 156
  • E 182
  • F 212
  • G 235
  • H 256
  • I 299
  • J 303
  • K 313
  • L 331
  • M 363
  • N 434
  • O 472
  • P 485
  • Q 585
  • R 586
  • S 613
  • T 671
  • U 693
  • V 697
  • W 699
  • Y 763
  • Z 766
  • Appendix - The Radical Liberal Family Networks 767
  • Acknowledgements 769
  • Archival Sources 771
  • Select Bibliography 774
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