The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928

By Elizabeth Crawford | Go to book overview

N

NAIRN committee of the NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE Was in existence in 1872 when its convenor was Provost Mackintosh. In 1913 the society was a member of the NORTH OF SCOTLAND FEDERATION OF THE NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES. Secretary (1909) Miss Janet Clunas, Cawdor Place, Nairn; (1913) Miss Laing, Holmwood, Nairn.

NATIONAL COUNCIL FOR ADULT SUFFRAGE Formed in September 1916 by a combination of dissidents from the NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES and the UNITED SUFFRAGISTS, together with Labour and Socialist leaders, to bring pressure to bear on the Speaker’s conference that had been convened to discuss the suffrage question. Sylvia PANKHURST had been instrumental in its formation but left when it became apparent that its aims and methods were not likely to be as radical as she had hoped. Chairman: Henry NEVINSON; treasurer: Emmeline PETHICK-LAWRENCE; secretaries: Kathleen COURTNEY and James Middleton (of the ILP). Among the members of its executive committee were Catherine MARSHALL, George LANSBURY, Maude ROYDEN, Helena SWANWICK and Evelyn SHARP.

NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL AND PROFESSIONAL WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETY Founded at the end of 1905 to accommodate those women who wished to resign from the NORTH OF ENGLAND SOCIETY FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE along with Esther ROPER, Eva GORE-BOOTH and Christabel PANKHURST, but who did not wish to ally themselves directly with textile workers and trade unionists. Katherine THOMASSON, a radical Liberal, although reluctant to finance the LANCASHIRE AND CHESHIRE WOMEN TEXTILE AND OTHER WORKERS’ REPRESENTATION COMMITTEE, immediately gave the National Industrial and Professional Women’s Suffrage Society £210 and in 1913 was still a member of its executive committee. The National Industrial and Profesional Women’s Suffrage Society, besides being a group in its own right, was also an umbrella society for the LCWTOWRC and the MANCHESTER AND SALFORD WOMEN’S TRADE AND LABOUR COUNCIL. It was “a society composed of women workers of all grades, and of others interested in the industrial aspect of the Suffrage question” (Suffrage Annual and Women’s Who’s Who, 1913). The society saw the franchise as the means of achieving industrial and economic rights for women and was particularly concerned with combating protective legislation which would have deprived such women as barmaids and workers at the pit brow of their livelihood. In October 1911 the society organized a public meeting in London, at the Memorial Hall, Farringdon Street (home of radical causes), to protest against the abolition of women’s work at the pit brow and to demand the franchise. Walter McLaren (see Eva MCLAREN), Sarah Dickenson, Sarah REDDISH and Esther Roper were among the speakers. The National Industrial and Professional Women’s Suffrage Society was represented at the NUWSS celebrations on 13 March 1918 to mark the partial enfranchisement of women.

Secretary (1913) Esther Roper; treasurer (1913) Mrs Elizabeth Howarth, who had been a member of the executive committee of the NEWSS, but resigned with Esther Roper in 1905.

Address: (1913) 5 John Dalton Street, Manchester; 33 Fitzroy Square, London W1.

Bibliography: J. Liddington and J. Norris, One Hand Tied Behind Us: The Rise of the Women’s Suffrage Movement, 1978.

NATIONAL POLITICAL LEAGUE For men and women, founded in 1911 by Mary Adelaide Broadhurst, who had been the WOMEN’S FREEDOM LEAGUE organizer in Liverpool. The NPL aimed to further social and political reforms on a non-party basis. The extension of the suffrage to duly qualified women was considered the necessary precursor of any such reform. By 1913 the League intimated that it had begun collecting and classifying information on existing social and industrial conditions in order that future political activity, after enfranchisement, might be based on an asssured grasp of the subject. The League had also set up a publishing department, an intelligence bureau and a press agency. Vice-presidents of the League included Lady Aberconway (see Laura MCLAREN), Janie ALLAN, Lady COWDRAY, Lady WRIGHT and Ethel SNOWDEN; George LANSBURY, Henry HARBEN and John SCURR were supporters. An impassioned meeting attended by 1500 people held by the League at the Kings way Hall on 19 March 1913 to protest against forcible feeding was reported verbatim by the police to the Home Office and received the laconic annotation, “Mr G.B. Shaw makes jokes - and Dr Mansell Moulin [sic] tells lies.” The League held a meeting in the Queen’s Hall on 8 July 1913 to protest against the “Cat and Mouse” Act and was of assistance to Maud Arncliffe SENNETT and the NORTHERN MEN’S FEDERATION when the men from Scotland arrived in London later that month. During the First World War the NPL organized the National Land Council, setting up 11 centres at which women were trained to work on the land. By 1917, with the same London address, it was renamed the National Political Reform League.

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The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations vi
  • Introduction ix
  • A 1
  • B 24
  • C 90
  • D 156
  • E 182
  • F 212
  • G 235
  • H 256
  • I 299
  • J 303
  • K 313
  • L 331
  • M 363
  • N 434
  • O 472
  • P 485
  • Q 585
  • R 586
  • S 613
  • T 671
  • U 693
  • V 697
  • W 699
  • Y 763
  • Z 766
  • Appendix - The Radical Liberal Family Networks 767
  • Acknowledgements 769
  • Archival Sources 771
  • Select Bibliography 774
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