The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928

By Elizabeth Crawford | Go to book overview

P

PADDINGTON (NORTH) (branch of the LONDON SOCIETY FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE, NUWSS) Secretary (1909) Mrs Bertram, 38 Palace Mansions, Addison Bridge, London W.

PADDINGTON (SOUTH) (branch of the LONDON SOCIETY FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE, NUWSS) Secretary (1909) Mrs Bertram, 38 Palace Mansions, Addison Bridge, London W; (1913) Miss Boyd, 5 Onslow Place, London SW.

PADDINGTON AND MARYLEBONE (WSPU) Secretary (1906) Miss Hooper, 34 St Ervan’s Road, Paddington, (1913) Mrs Cooke, 52 Praed Street, Paddington, London W.

PAISLEY committee of the NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE Formed in 1872. Treasurer Mrs S. Robertson, Castlehead, Paisley. In 1913, refounded, the society was a member of the SCOTTISH FEDERATION OF THE NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES. Secretary (1913) Miss Risk, 36 Whitehaugh Drive, Paisley, Renfrewshire.

PAISLEY (WFL) Secretary (1913) Miss Dracup, 10 Townhead Terrace, Paisley.

PALLISER, EDITH (1859- alive 1925) Born in Comragh, Co. Waterford, she became secretary of the CENTRAL COMMITTEE OF THE NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE in 1895, succeeding Helen BLACKBURN. She also at this time became, with Esther ROPER, joint secretary of a group drawn from the different suffrage societies to promote joint parliamentary action. Between 1903 and 1906 she funded and edited the Women’s Suffrage Record for the NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES. Elizabeth Wolstenholme ELMY wote to Harriet MCILQUHAM on 17 September 1904, “I only learned the other day that the WS Record is a private effort of Miss Palliser’s own - the National Union contributing not one penny.” After 1907, when the society renamed itself the LONDON SOCIETY FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE, Edith Palliser became chairman of the committee and Philippa STRACHEY succeeded her as secretary. From 1897 Edith Palliser was also co-secretary of the NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES, of which, with Frances STERLING, she was one of the architects, taking over in 1911 as parliamentary secretary from Bertha MASON. Having suffered from periods of ill health, she resigned from this position in January 1913, being succeeded in it by Catherine MARSHALL. In 1903 Edith Palliser was secretary of the English National Subcommittee of the International Woman Suffrage Committee which advised on the formation of the INTERNATIONAL WOMAN SUFFRAGE ALLIANCE, in 1904 attended the Alliance’s first meeting in Berlin and in 1908 that in Amsterdam. In 1907 she contributed an essay, “The International Movement for Women’s Suffrage”, to Brougham Villiers (ed.), The Case for Women’s Suffrage. In 1900 Edith Palliser wrote a leaflet, Some Reasons Why Working Women Want the Vote, and in 1906 she attended, in her individual capacity, the annual conference of the LANCASHIRE AND CHESHIRE WOMEN TEXTILE AND OTHER WORKERS’ REPRESENTATION COMMITTEE. Also in that year, as she had in 1902, she attended the annual conference of the National Union of Women Workers. In 1915 she became chairman of the newly formed London Committee for the Scottish Women’s Hospitals and remained in this position for the duration of the war. She subscribed to the London Society until 1926. There is no trace, in Britain, of her death; she may have returned to Ireland. Esther Palliser, who may have been her sister, wrote songs for a matinee given by the ACTRESSES’ FRANCHISE LEAGUE at the Scala Theatre in November 1909.

Address: (1913) 26 Pembroke Square, London W.

Photograph: in Fawcett Library Collection.

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The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations vi
  • Introduction ix
  • A 1
  • B 24
  • C 90
  • D 156
  • E 182
  • F 212
  • G 235
  • H 256
  • I 299
  • J 303
  • K 313
  • L 331
  • M 363
  • N 434
  • O 472
  • P 485
  • Q 585
  • R 586
  • S 613
  • T 671
  • U 693
  • V 697
  • W 699
  • Y 763
  • Z 766
  • Appendix - The Radical Liberal Family Networks 767
  • Acknowledgements 769
  • Archival Sources 771
  • Select Bibliography 774
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