The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928

By Elizabeth Crawford | Go to book overview

Q

QUI VIVE CORPS At first called, rather clumsily, the “Marchers’ Qui Vive Corps”, founded in 1912 by Florence DE FONBLANQUE as the result of the enjoyment derived from involvement in the Women’s March and the sense that the country was, whatever the political parties might think, supportive of women’s enfranchisement. Its aim was to bind members from all suffrage societies in a body that could be “mobilized”, offering its services to different societies impartially and whenever extra workers were required for any definite purpose. One of its objects was, “To show that the women of England are as capable of organisation, comradeship and discipline, as the men.” The members were pledged to abstain from militant action while actually wearing the “Q.V.” uniform of brown with green cockade and badge.

The Corps, although not militant, was distinctly militaristic. Its orders for the day, issued in Sussex in 1913, mentioned rallying at the “Depot” on Saturday afternoons and making a “March” on an outlying district to hold a meeting there. Members were prepared periodically to make longer marches to Brighton, Shoreham, Worthing, Hastings, Eastbourne and the west of England. Although intended as a national movement, it does not appear to have spread beyond Sussex, the centre of influence of its founder. In 1913 Lady COWDRAY entertained the Qui Vive Corps at Cowdray Park. Just as the NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES adopted the idea of the Women’s March as the basis for its 1913 PILGRIMAGE, so in 1914 it produced its own version of the Qui Vive Corps, the ACTIVE SERVICE LEAGUE. The Qui Vive Corps participated in the NUWSS victory celebrations on 13 March 1918. Leader and honorary organizer (1912) Florence de Fonblanque; honorary treasurer, Miss M.E. Byham; honorary secretary Miss A.N. Roff, Easebourne, Midhurst, Sussex; secretary pro tem Ruth Cavendish-BENTINCK.

Address: (1913) 8 Park Mansions Arcade, Knightsbridge, London SW; (1914 and 1917) Duncton, Petworth, Sussex. In 1913 a Qui Vive Corps shop was opened at 60 West Street, Horsham, Sussex.

Archival source: Papers of Margaret Byham, Fawcett Library.

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The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations vi
  • Introduction ix
  • A 1
  • B 24
  • C 90
  • D 156
  • E 182
  • F 212
  • G 235
  • H 256
  • I 299
  • J 303
  • K 313
  • L 331
  • M 363
  • N 434
  • O 472
  • P 485
  • Q 585
  • R 586
  • S 613
  • T 671
  • U 693
  • V 697
  • W 699
  • Y 763
  • Z 766
  • Appendix - The Radical Liberal Family Networks 767
  • Acknowledgements 769
  • Archival Sources 771
  • Select Bibliography 774
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