The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928

By Elizabeth Crawford | Go to book overview

R

RADCLIFFE (NUWSS) In 1910 the society joined the MANCHESTER AND DISTRICT FEDERATION OF THE NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES. Secretary (1909) Miss Allen, Holly Bank, Whitefield; (1913) Miss K. Schofield, Stanley House, Besses o’ th’ Barn, Lancashire.

RADIO, TELEVISION, RECORDINGS AND RECORDS It is ironic that it is the contemporary spoken force of the women’s suffrage campaign that is today least well represented in archives. The reality of the campaign has been captured on film, but there is apparently no surviving recording of the voices of Mrs PANKHURST, Mrs FAWCETT, or Mrs DESPARD. Thomas Edison had invented the phonograph in 1877 but it was only at the end of the century that the “phonograph” or “gramophone” industry began to develop. In its early days there was no preconceived notion that the gramophone should be used to transmit only music. The Electric World suggested in 1890 that interviews with statesmen such as Gladstone and Bismarck could be reproduced via the phonograph. In 1911 HMV had in its catalogue “Political Records” by (speaking on the budget) Asquith, Lloyd George and Churchill, others speaking about the navy and, to do something to rectify the political balance of the list, a message recorded by Bonar Law. In the early twentieth century the women’s suffrage societies were aware of the possibilities of this new medium. Pathéphone speeches had been recorded at some point before April 1908, when they were mentioned during the course of a WFL bazaar at Caxton Hall, by Mrs Despard, Lady GROVE, Edith How MARTYN and Teresa BILLINGTON-GREIG. The latter had recorded c. 1907 a “Votes for Women” speech for use in the campaign, perhaps the one mentioned in 1908. In April 1914 gramophone speeches were heard from Chrystal MACMILLAN and Dr Drysdale at a meeting of the NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES. There is one extant recording of a speech given by Christabel PANKHURST. This is now available as a track on a Pavilion Records CD, Blaze of the Day. The accompanying notes give the date of its recording as 18 December 1908. However, this cannot be correct, as on that day Christabel Pankhurst was still serving a prison sentence in Holloway and was not released until the evening of 19 December 1908. Another source refers to “Christabel Pankhurst’s ‘Suffrage for Women’ Speech”, presumably the same one, which was issued by the Gramophone Company in 1909. Whatever its date, it is likely to be the speech mentioned in the Woman’s Leader, 28 August 1925, as having been recently re-released. It is rather surprising that the marketing strategists at the WOMEN’S SOCIAL AND POLITICAL UNION did not do more to capitalize on the oratorical power of their leaders. There is no mention in any WSPU literature of records for sale of speeches by Emmeline and Christabel Pankhurst, which assuredly would have been very popular. The SUFFRAGETTE FELLOWSHIP in 1947 commissioned a record from GB Ltd, a gramophone company. On one side it carries a speech by Frederick PETHICK-LAWRENCE and on the other one by Emmeline PETHICK-LAWRENCE.

The BBC did not begin broadcasting until 1922 and the earliest recording in the BBC archive of a suffrage activist is of Ethel SMYTH and dates from 1937. The BBC had broadcast the unveiling of Mrs Pankhurst’s statue on 6 March 1930, but no recording survives. The BBC played its part in making the women’s suffrage campaign synonymous in the mind of the general public with that of the WSPU. It is clear that from the late 1940s members of the Suffragette Fellowship had a degree of access to the BBC. No recordings, if they were made, survive of any interviews made between the end of the Second World War and 1980 with any constitutional suffragist; even the 1980 interviews with Margery Corbett ASHBY and Hazel Hunkins Hallinan were inspired by the centenary of the birth of Christabel Pankhurst. On 13 March 1951 the BBC broadcast a play by Jill Craigie, The Women’s Rebellion subtitled “A dramatised impression of the Suffragette Movement”. The characters around whom the play was based are shown in the cast list as Emmeline Pankhurst, Christabel Pankhurst, Annie KENNEY, Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence, Irene MILLER, Charlotte MARSH, Mary LEIGH, Lloyd George, Herbert Gladstone, Sir Edward Grey, a prison governor and, rather intriguingly, Emily DAVIES. One cannot help but wonder if, in this company, the last named (played by Violet Carson) has not been confused with Emily Wilding DAVISON. Charlotte Marsh was an adviser to the production. No recording of the play survives, although the text is presumably still in the possession of the author. From the cast list one can deduce something of the play’s scope. Jill Craigie wrote an article “Honourable Gaol-birds”, published in the Radio Times, 9 March 1951, revealing that “Today I have what I think must be the largest suffragette library outside the suffragette museum [then the Suffragette Fellowship Record Room], not to mention the many hundreds of photographs, letters and mementoes that suffragettes so kindly sent me.” This material and, presumably, conversations with its donors had led her to conclude that “it was the fear of a renewal of militant activities that enabled the first Bill granting the vote to women over the age of thirty to be passed without a hitch.”

-586-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations vi
  • Introduction ix
  • A 1
  • B 24
  • C 90
  • D 156
  • E 182
  • F 212
  • G 235
  • H 256
  • I 299
  • J 303
  • K 313
  • L 331
  • M 363
  • N 434
  • O 472
  • P 485
  • Q 585
  • R 586
  • S 613
  • T 671
  • U 693
  • V 697
  • W 699
  • Y 763
  • Z 766
  • Appendix - The Radical Liberal Family Networks 767
  • Acknowledgements 769
  • Archival Sources 771
  • Select Bibliography 774
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 786

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.