The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928

By Elizabeth Crawford | Go to book overview

S

SAFFRON WALDEN (branch of the LONDON SOCIETY FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE) Was in existence in 1906 when its honorary secretary was Miss Mitchell, The Training College, Saffron Walden, Essex.

ST ALBANS (NUWSS) In 1913 the society was a member of the EASTERN COUNTIES FEDERATION OF THE NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE. Secretary (1913) Miss Lee, 1 Lemsford Road, St Albans, Hertfordshire.

ST ANDREWS committee of the NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE Formed in 1871 when the honorary secretary was Mrs Baynes. In 1913 the local society was a member of the SCOTTISH FEDERATION OF THE NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES. Secretary (1913) Mrs Finlay, New Halls, St Andrews, Fife.

ST ANDREWS branch of the SCOTTISH UNIVERSITY WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE UNION Secretary (1913) Miss J.M. Benson, St Andrews University Women’s Suffrage Society, The University, St Andrews, Fife.

ST BEES (NUWSS) In 1913 the society was a member of the NORTH-WESTERN FEDERATION OF THE NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES. Secretary (1913) Miss Florence Walker, 2 Victoria Terrace, St Bees, Cumberland.

ST GEORGE’S, HANOVER SQUARE (branch of the LONDON SOCIETY FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE, NUWSS) Secretary (1913) Mrs Bertram, 38 Palace Mansions, Addison Bridge, London W.

ST HELEN’S (NUWSS) In 1913 the society was a member of the WEST LANCS, WEST CHESHIRE, AND NORTH WALES FEDERATION OF THE NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES. Secretary (1913) Miss Christine Pilkington, The Hazels, Prescot, Lancashire.

ST IVES (NUWSS) In 1913 the society was a member of the SOUTH-WESTERN FEDERATION OF THE NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES. Secretary (1913) Mrs F. Crichton Matthew, 9 Draycott Terrace, St Ives, Cornwall.

ST JOHN, CHRISTOPHER MARIE (pseudonym of Christabel Marshall) (c. 1875-1960) Educated at Somerville College, Oxford, gaining third-class honours in Modern History. She was for a short time secretary to Mrs Humphry Ward, and afterwards to both Lady Randolph Churchill and, at intervals, to her son Winston Churchill. Intent on becoming a dramatist, she spent three years on the stage, worked on occasion as secretary to Ellen Terry and from 1899 lived with Edith CRAIG. Although a feminist and admirer of militant tactics, she did not formally join the WOMEN’S SOCIAL AND POLITICAL UNION until 1909; she had previously worked for both the WOMEN WRITERS’ SUFFRAGE LEAGUE and the ACTRESSES’ FRANCHISE LEAGUE. In 1909 she saw the dramatic possibility in a short story, How The Vote Was Won, written by Cicely HAMILTON which had been published as a pamphlet, with illustrations by C. Hedley Charlton, by the WWSL. Christopher St John turned the story into a play and it was first performed at an Actresses’ Franchise League matinée in April 1909, played at the WSPU Prince’s Skating Rink Exhibition in May and was to prove very popular with suffrage societies throughout the country. On 29 June she took part in the WSPU deputation to the House of Commons, contributing an article “Why I Went on the Deputation” to Votes for Women, 9 July 1909. In November 1909 Christopher St John played the woman-soldier, Hannah Snell, in Cicely Hamilton’s Pageant of Great Women, directed by Edith Craig. With Cicely Hamilton she also wrote The Pot and The Kettle, 1909, and with Charles Thursby, The Coronation, 1912. Her play The First Actress, “celebrating the struggle of women in the theatre against sex discrimination”, was performed in May 1911 as the first presentation of Edith Craig’s company, the Pioneer Players. Christabel Marshall had earlier converted to Roman Catholicism, at which point she took the surname “St John”, and in 1912 she presented a BANNER to the CATHOLIC WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETY, becoming a member of the society’s committee in 1913.

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The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations vi
  • Introduction ix
  • A 1
  • B 24
  • C 90
  • D 156
  • E 182
  • F 212
  • G 235
  • H 256
  • I 299
  • J 303
  • K 313
  • L 331
  • M 363
  • N 434
  • O 472
  • P 485
  • Q 585
  • R 586
  • S 613
  • T 671
  • U 693
  • V 697
  • W 699
  • Y 763
  • Z 766
  • Appendix - The Radical Liberal Family Networks 767
  • Acknowledgements 769
  • Archival Sources 771
  • Select Bibliography 774
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