The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928

By Elizabeth Crawford | Go to book overview

T

TAIN committee of the NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE Was in existence in 1872 when E. McLardy, Esq. was honorary secretary. In 1913 the society was a member of the SCOTTISH FEDERATION OF THE NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES. Secretary (NUWSS) (1913) Miss F. Maclean, Sunnyside, Tain, Ross and Cromarty.

TANNER, MARGARET PRIESTMAN, MRS (1817-1905) Quaker, born in Newcastle, sister of Anna Maria and Mary PRIESTMAN, aunt of Helen Bright CLARK and of Anne ASHWORTH and Lilias Ashworth HALLETT. She was particularly friendly with John Bright, the widower of her elder sister Elizabeth. In 1846 she married Daniel Wheeler, a Bristol Quaker, and moved south. He died in 1848 and in 1855 she married Arthur Tanner of Sidcot, who died in 1869. There were no children of either marriage. Thereafter she lived with her sisters, who moved from Newcastle to Bristol. Margaret Tanner was involved in all feminist radical causes espoused by other members of her kinship network (see Appendix). In 1866 she signed the women’s suffrage petition and in 1866-7 subscribed to the ENFRANCHISEMENT OF WOMEN COMMITTEE. By 1872 she was a member of the committee of the BRISTOL AND WEST OF ENGLAND BRANCH OF THE NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE. She was a member of the Bristol Women’s Liberal Association, the first in the country, founded by her sister Anna Maria Priestman in 1881. With her other sister Mary, she was a leading member of the Ladies’ National Association to Repeal the Contagious Diseases Acts and in 1895 attended, at Colmar, a meeting of the International Society of that campaign. In the 1890s Margaret Tanner was also president of the Western Temperance League (her sister-in-law Margaret Bright LUCAS was a leading temperance reformer) and headed the poll in the election to the parish council of Winscombe, where she had a country house. She spoke in support of the claim of women members of the Society of Friends to be accepted as an integral part of the Society’s Yearly Meeting. She was friendly with Emily FORD, who in 1883 introduced her to Susan B. Anthony. From 1890 Margaret Tanner was a member of the executive committee of the CENTRAL NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE.

Address: (1855-1905) Oakridge, Yatton, Somerset; (1870- 1905) 37 Durdham Park, Bristol.

Photograph: carte de visite in Josephine Butler Collection, Fawcett Library.

TAUNTON (NUWSS) In 1913 the society was a member of the WEST OF ENGLAND FEDERATION OF THE NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES. Secretary (1913) Rev. F.W. Percy; assistant secretary, Miss Greswell, 2 Haines Hill Terrace, Taunton, Somerset.

TAX RESISTANCE LEAGUE Formed in October 1909 to conduct a campaign of constitutional militancy and organized resistance by women to taxation. The TRL was the culmination of a venerable tradition dating back to 1870, which was employed by workers in the cause of women’s enfranchisement; Charlotte BABB, Rose Ann Hall, the PRIESTMAN SISTERS, Henrietta MULLER and Dora MONTEFIORE had all sought to highlight the anomaly of women, although unfranchised, being subject to tax. The TRL was founded at a meeting held at the invitation of Dr Louisa Garrett ANDERSON. Others present at this meeting, which was chaired by Margaret Wynne NEVINSON, were Mr Herbert Jacobs, Mary Sargant FLORENCE, Dr Elizabeth WILKS, Dr Kate Haslam, Dr Winifred Patch, Cicely HAMILTON, Edith How MARTYN, Clemence HOUSMAN, Mrs Wells, Mrs Ayres Purdie, Sarah BENETT, Gertrude ANSELL, Lady HARBERTON, Anne Cobden SANDERSON, Lilian HICKS, Miss Carr Shaw, Sime SERUYA, Mrs Kate Freeman and Margaret Kineton PARKES. By 1910 the committee comprised Louisa Garrett Anderson, Mary Sargant Florence, Dr Kate Haslam, Evelina HAVERFIELD, Amy HICKS; Clemence Housman, Anne Cobden Sanderson, and Sime Seruya.

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The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations vi
  • Introduction ix
  • A 1
  • B 24
  • C 90
  • D 156
  • E 182
  • F 212
  • G 235
  • H 256
  • I 299
  • J 303
  • K 313
  • L 331
  • M 363
  • N 434
  • O 472
  • P 485
  • Q 585
  • R 586
  • S 613
  • T 671
  • U 693
  • V 697
  • W 699
  • Y 763
  • Z 766
  • Appendix - The Radical Liberal Family Networks 767
  • Acknowledgements 769
  • Archival Sources 771
  • Select Bibliography 774
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