The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928

By Elizabeth Crawford | Go to book overview

W

WAKEFIELD committee of the NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE Was in existence in 1872 when its honorary secretary was Miss Julia BARMBY, Westgate Parsonage. The Wakefield Women’s Suffrage Society was refounded in 1904 as a member of the NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES and by 1913 was a member of the WEST RIDING FEDERATION. Secretary (1913) Miss F.M. Beaumont, Hatfield Hall, Wakefield, Yorkshire.

WALKDEN (WFL) Secretary (1913) Mrs Rogerson, 33 Westminster Road, Walkden, near Manchester, Lancashire.

WALKER AND WALLSEND (NUWSS) In 1913 the society was a member of the NORTH-EASTERN FEDERATION OF THE NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES. Secretary (1913) Miss M. Ellis, 613 Welbeck Road, Walker-on-Tyne, Northumberland.

WALLASEY (WSPU) Secretary (1913) Miss Lee, 58 Belvedere Road, Wallasey, Cheshire.

WALLASEY AND WIRRAL (NUWSS) In 1913 the society was a member of the WEST LANCS, WEST CHESHIRE, AND NORTH WALES FEDERATION OF THE NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES. Secretary (1909) Miss McPherson, 16 Newland Drive, Liscard, Cheshire; (1913) pro tem Miss J. Ward Platt, Warrendene, New Brighton, Cheshire.

WALLINGTON (WSPU) Secretary (1913) Mrs De Vere Mathew, Dinham, Hillside Gardens, Wallington, Surrey.

WALSALL (NUWSS) In 1913 the society was a member of the NORTH-WESTERN FEDERATION OF THE NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES. Secretary (1913) pro tem Mis Lowry, 74 Lysways Street, Walsall, Staffordshire.

WALSALL (WSPU) Address (1911) Field House, Buchanan Road, Walsall.

WALMSLEY, AMY (1868-1928) From 1895 the forceful and business-like principal of Bedford Kindergarten Preparatory Schools and Kindergarten Training College, which were run according to Froebel principles and which, under the previous headmistress (who had signed the 1889 Declaration in Favour of Women’s Suffrage organized by the CENTRAL COMMITTEE OF THE NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE) had advertised in the Women’s Penny Paper. In 1903 Amy Walmsley was elected a member of the borough education committee and a governor of Luton Modern School. In 1908 she was instrumental in the refounding of the BEDFORD WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETY, was its honorary secretary in 1909 and its chairman from 1913, many of the meetings of the society being held at her house. After that society was dissolved in 1918 she founded, in 1920, the Bedford branch of the National Council of Women Workers. In 1918 she stood, unsuccessfully, as parliamentary candidate at a by-election.

Address: (1908) 74 Ashburnham Road, Bedford; (1928) 10a Oaklands Road, Bedford.

Photograph: in R. Smart, Bedford Training College, 1882- 1982, 1982.

Bibliography: R. Smart, Bedford Training College, 1882- 1982, 1982.

WALTHAMSTOW (WSPU) Was in existence in early 1908. Secretary (1913) Miss Hart, 11 Sylvan Road, Walthamstow, London E.

WALTON, OLIVE GRACE (1886-1937) One of four children of Charles Walton, a retired wine merchant, by his second wife. He was in his 70s when Olive was born and died when she was seven years old. The children were then brought up in a somewhat puritanical household by their mother, who before her marriage had been a missionary in Africa, working there with a daughter of her husband’s first marriage. Olive Walton attended a small private school and, with her family, spent two years in Germany, an experience from which she derived little educational benefit. Her brother and one of her sisters went to Oxford, but Olive Walton was unacademic and considered a misfit in the family. After attending cookery and art classes she was sent to London to do social work. She joined the Tunbridge Wells branch of the WOMEN’S SOCIAL AND POLITICAL UNION and, once living in London, was drawn into increasingly militant activity. Her niece believed that Olive Walton’s involvement in the WSPU was “a godsend” for her. She was imprisoned in November 1911 for seven days and then, as a result of taking part in the window-smashing campaign, spent March to June 1912 in Aylesbury prison, where she went on hunger strike and was forcibly fed. Her family were horrified by such a disgrace; her brother and a sister went to court to bail her, but she refused any assistance. Her younger sister, in spite of Olive’s request, refused to meet her on her release from prison. Olive Walton apparently kept a diary while in prison, but its whereabouts is now unknown.

-699-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations vi
  • Introduction ix
  • A 1
  • B 24
  • C 90
  • D 156
  • E 182
  • F 212
  • G 235
  • H 256
  • I 299
  • J 303
  • K 313
  • L 331
  • M 363
  • N 434
  • O 472
  • P 485
  • Q 585
  • R 586
  • S 613
  • T 671
  • U 693
  • V 697
  • W 699
  • Y 763
  • Z 766
  • Appendix - The Radical Liberal Family Networks 767
  • Acknowledgements 769
  • Archival Sources 771
  • Select Bibliography 774
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 786

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.