The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928

By Elizabeth Crawford | Go to book overview

Y

YARMOUTH (NUWSS) In 1913 the society was a member of the EASTERN COUNTIES FEDERATION OF THE NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES. Secretary (1913) Miss Teasdel, Martelsham, Southtown, Gorleston, Norfolk.

YATES, ROSE LAMARTINE, MRS (1875-1954) Born in Brixton of French parentage, educated at Clapham and Truro High Schools, at Kassel and at the Sorbonne. In 1896 she entered Royal Holloway College, studying modern languages. She left before the end of her final year, but passed the Oxford final honours examination in modern languages and philology. In 1900 she married a solicitor, Tom Lamartine Yates. They were both keen cyclists and had met through the Cyclists Touring Club, to the council of which Rose was in 1907 elected as its first woman member. When she stood for this election she publicly stated that she was not a suffragette. However, a year later, in a speech titled “How I became a Suffragist”, she wrote “on looking into the matter seriously I find I have never been anything else . . . and . . . I came to realise that I was and must remain one at whatever personal cost”. She joined the Wimbledon branch of the WOMEN’S SOCIAL AND POLITICAL UNION soon after it was founded in January 1909, and quickly joined its committee.

For her birthday in January 1909 her husband gave Rose Lamartine Yates a letter containing the sentence, “The present I give thee is not gold or silver but permission freely and gladly, to offer up thy liberty for the benefit of downtrodden women.” On 24 February 1909 Rose Lamartine Yates was a member of the deputation led by Emmeline PETHICK-LAWRENCE from Caxton Hall to the House of Commons. She was arrested and, despite her husband acting for her defence at her trial, was sentenced to one month’s imprisonment. Her son was eight months old at the time. On her release she and 25 other suffragette prisoners were escorted in procession by WSPU members to a breakfast at the Inns of Court Hotel. She then returned to Merton; her home had been decorated in the WSPU colours to mark the occasion. At the end of April 1909 she was presented with one of the new illuminated addresses given to all WSPU members who had served at least one week’s imprisonment and a “Holloway brooch” (see JEWELLERY), both of which had been designed by Sylvia PANKHURST. Rose Lamartine Yates continued as a very active member of the Wimbledon WSPU, chairing local meetings, indoors and on Wimbledon Common, often as the principal speaker. “A Month in a Common Gaol for the Faith” was the title of one of her popular talks and she gave a lantern lecture, “A true story of the militant campaign”, “illustrated by actual photographs of events”. In September 1909 she went on a brief lecture tour to Monmouth and Bath, probably staying with the BLATHWAYTS at Eagle House, Batheaston. She certainly planted an Austrian pine in “Annie’s Arboretum”. Rose Lamartine Yates supplied flowers, eggs, fruit and vegetables from her large garden to be sold at the Wimbledon WSPU SHOP. For her birthday in 1910 her husband’s present to her was 48 chairs for the meeting room attached to the shop. In the course of the year she became treasurer and organizing secretary of the Wimbledon WSPU. In 1911 her husband’s present was a clock for the WSPU shop. Wimbledon attracted a steady stream of eminent speakers from all the suffrage societies. Among regular visitors were Georgina BRACKENBURY, Mary GAWTHORPE, Emily Wilding DAVISON, Dr MANSELL-MOULLIN, George LANSBURY, Anne Cobden SANDERSON, who in 1913 spoke on “Women in the Workhouse”, Ernest Duval who gave a talk on “Mary Astell”, and H.D. HARBEN.

Rose Lamartine Yates spent summers with her son at the family’s cottage in Seasalter near Whitstable and, with a fellow WSPU worker, Gertrude Wilkinson, who stayed nearby, carried on a suffrage campaign in that area. Tom Lamartine Yates, a member of the MEN’S POLITICAL UNION FOR WOMEN’S ENFRANCHISEMENT, was arrested during the demonstrations on 21 November 1911, protesting against the “torpedoing” of the Conciliation Bill. He was not prosecuted, but the publicity adversely affected his firm. He often acted as legal adviser for WSPU prisoners and in June 1913 he represented the Davison family at the inquest into the death of Emily Wilding Davison. Rose was the “first guard of honour” to Emily Davison’s coffin on its journey between Epsom and King’s Cross.

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The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations vi
  • Introduction ix
  • A 1
  • B 24
  • C 90
  • D 156
  • E 182
  • F 212
  • G 235
  • H 256
  • I 299
  • J 303
  • K 313
  • L 331
  • M 363
  • N 434
  • O 472
  • P 485
  • Q 585
  • R 586
  • S 613
  • T 671
  • U 693
  • V 697
  • W 699
  • Y 763
  • Z 766
  • Appendix - The Radical Liberal Family Networks 767
  • Acknowledgements 769
  • Archival Sources 771
  • Select Bibliography 774
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