The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928

By Elizabeth Crawford | Go to book overview

Z

ZANGWILL, EDITH CHAPLIN, MRS (c. 1879-1945) Born in Japan, daughter of Professor W.E. Ayrton and his first wife, and cousin, Dr. Matilda Chaplin Ayrton (1846-83). Her maternal grandmother, Mrs Matilda Chaplin, who lived in Blandford Square close to Barbara BODICHON, signed the 1866 women’s suffrage petition. After her mother’s death Edith Ayrton was cared for in Sussex by Mrs Ayrton Chaplin, who was her father’s cousin and her mother’s sister-in-law, until her father’s marriage to Hertha AYRTON. In November 1903 Edith Ayrton married Israel Zangwill; they eventually had three children. She took part in the “Mud March” in February 1907 and was a member of the NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES, until leaving to join the WSPU in 1909. In 1910 she gave a donation to the NEW CONSTITUTIONAL SOCIETY FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE and in 1913 supported the NATIONAL POLITICAL LEAGUE. In 1914 she became a leading member of the UNITED SUFFRAGISTS. Edith Zangwill contributed a short story to the first issue of the Freewoman, edited by Dora MARSDEN and Mary GAWTHORPE, but publicly disassociated herself from the paper in the next issue, objecting to what she considered to be an attack on Christabel PANKHURST. Among her novels, The Call, published by Allen and Unwin in 1924 and dedicated “To all those who fought for the Freedom of Women”, which centres on the militant suffrage struggle and on the experiences of a woman scientist in the First World War, is very clearly based on the life of her step-mother.

Address: (1913) Far End, East Preston, Sussex.

Photograph: in the Vote, 8 January 1910.

Bibliography: E. Hill, “Mrs Israel Zangwill”, in the Vote, 8 January 1910; E. Sharp, Hertha Ayrton, 1926.

ZANGWILL, ISRAEL (1864-1926) Jewish, novelist, Zionist, and staunch supporter of the women’s suffrage movement. He bought his house in Sussex from Henry Holiday, artist and fellow suffrage supporter, c. 1906-8. He was present at the banquet given on 11 December 1906 at the Savoy by Millicent Fawcett to celebrate the release of WOMEN’S SOCIAL AND POLITICAL UNION prisoners. Two of his speeches, “One and One are Two” and “Talked Out!”, given at the Exeter Hall on 9 February and 8 March 1907 respectively, were published as an appendix to Brougham Villiers (ed.), The Case for Women’s Suffrage, 1907. In April 1907 Zangwill joined the MEN’S LEAGUE FOR WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE. Among his other speeches, that given at the Queen’s Hall on 7 June 1909 was published as “Old Fogeys and Old Bogeys”, by the Woman’s Press, that delivered at a WSPU rally on 10 November 1910 was published by the Garden City Press as “The Sword and the Spirit”, and “The Hithertos”, given to the WSPU on 28 March 1912, was also published by the Garden City Press. In 1913 Zangwill was a vice-president of the Men’s League and in 1914 supported the UNITED SUFFRAGISTS.

Address: (1913) Far End, East Preston, Sussex.

Portrait: by Walter Sickert, Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh.

Photograph: in the Vote, 16 January 1909.

Bibliography: E. Hill, “Mr Israel Zangwill”, in the Vote, 16 January 1909.

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The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations vi
  • Introduction ix
  • A 1
  • B 24
  • C 90
  • D 156
  • E 182
  • F 212
  • G 235
  • H 256
  • I 299
  • J 303
  • K 313
  • L 331
  • M 363
  • N 434
  • O 472
  • P 485
  • Q 585
  • R 586
  • S 613
  • T 671
  • U 693
  • V 697
  • W 699
  • Y 763
  • Z 766
  • Appendix - The Radical Liberal Family Networks 767
  • Acknowledgements 769
  • Archival Sources 771
  • Select Bibliography 774
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