The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928

By Elizabeth Crawford | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

I was delighted by the excellent response to a letter asking for details of material relating to the women’s suffrage campaign that I sent to all the record offices and main libraries in England, Scotland and Wales. Even if they did not hold any manuscript material many of the librarians took the trouble to photocopy relevant reports in local papers, which have proved very useful in spotting the campaigners as they travelled around the country. The following institutions do hold relevant material and I am indebted to their staff for the helpfulness and efficiency I experienced in the course of my visits, and, where relevant, for permission to quote from papers in their possession: Aberdeen Art Gallery; Bedfordshire Record Office; Birmingham Central Library, Archives Division; Bishopsgate Institute Library; Bodleian Library, Department of Special Collections and Western Manuscripts, Oxford; Bolton Archive Service; British Library, Department of Manuscripts; British Library of Political and Economic Science; Bristol University Library; Cambridgeshire County Record Office, Cambridge; Camden Local History Unit, Holborn Library; Camellia plc; Colindale Newspaper Library; Dundee District Archive and Record Centre; Dyrham Park, The National Trust; Friends’ Library, London; Essex Record Office; Fawcett Library, London; Girton College Archive, Cambridge; Glamorgan Record Office, Cardiff; Guildhall Library, City of London; Hammersmith and Fulham Archives; Kensington and Chelsea Local Studies Library; Lancashire Record Office; London Metropolitan Archives; Manchester Central Library, Local Studies Unit; Manchester City Art Gallery; Marx Memorial Library, London; Mitchell Library, Glasgow; Morley Reference Library; National Film Archive; National Portrait Gallery Archive; Newnham College Archive, Cambridge; Trustees of the National Library of Scotland, Edinburgh; North-West Sound Archive, Greater Manchester County Record Office Listening Station; Nottinghamshire Archives; Oldham Local Studies Library; Portsmouth City Records Office; Rochester upon Medway City Archives; Scottish Record Office, Edinburgh; Sheffield Archives, Sheffield Central Library; Southampton Archives Services; Victoria and Albert Museum Library and Print Room; West Sussex Record Office.

I have been particularly grateful for the service offered by the Public Record Office, Kew; the Family Record Centre; the Principal Registry of the Family Division; the Museum of London; David Doughan and the staff, past and present, of the Fawcett Library; and the staff and architect of the British Library, who have made working in the new building such a pleasure.

I am grateful to the following who have been generous with their time and with information; their interest and kindness has been appreciated: Lord Aberconway; Donald Bedford; Allan Bland; James Blewitt; Jim and Phyllis Bratt; Miss Elizabeth Bushnell, for detective work in the Eastern Cemetery, St Andrews; Irene Cockcroft; Krista Cowman; Ann Dingsdale; jay Dixon; Carol Dyhouse; Mr G. Fong; Livia Gollancz; Philip and Myrna Goode; Dr Sheila Hamilton; Pam Hirsch; Fred Hunter; Judy Goodman of the John Innes Society, Wimbledon; Leah Leneman; Jill Liddington; Terence Pepper, Curator of the Photographic Collection, National Portrait Gallery; Dr Mary Prior; Christine Pullen; June Purvis; Michael Rubinstein; Virginia Russell; Dr Anne Sutherland; Ruth Tomalin; Claire Tylee; Rosemary van Arsdel; Teresa Vanneck-Murray; Dr I.M. Webb; Colin White; and the archivists of University College, London, of St Andrews and Aberdeen Universities, of Lady Margaret Hall, Somerville, and Royal Holloway Colleges, of St Bartholomew’s Hospital, Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery, Southampton Art Gallery; and librarians at Grantham, Orkney and Great Yarmouth.

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The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations vi
  • Introduction ix
  • A 1
  • B 24
  • C 90
  • D 156
  • E 182
  • F 212
  • G 235
  • H 256
  • I 299
  • J 303
  • K 313
  • L 331
  • M 363
  • N 434
  • O 472
  • P 485
  • Q 585
  • R 586
  • S 613
  • T 671
  • U 693
  • V 697
  • W 699
  • Y 763
  • Z 766
  • Appendix - The Radical Liberal Family Networks 767
  • Acknowledgements 769
  • Archival Sources 771
  • Select Bibliography 774
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