The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928

By Elizabeth Crawford | Go to book overview

Archival Sources

I have given accession numbers when the papers may be difficult to identify; most of the manuscript material consulted is easy to locate in archive listings.

Aberdeen Museums and Art Gallery: Papers of Caroline Phillips.

Bedfordshire Record Office: Documents relating to the Bedford Society for Women’s Suffrage, 1908-18.

Birmingham Central Library, Archives Division: Birmingham Women’s Suffrage Society, 1900-1921; National Union of Women Workers, Birmingham branch; Birmingham Society for Promoting the Election of Women on Local Governing Bodies, 1907-21; letters of Mary S. Florence; Minutes of the Visiting Committee of HM Prison, Winson Green.

Bishopsgate Institute Library, London: Diaries and Papers of George Jacob Holyoake.

Bodleian Library, Department of Western Manuscripts, Oxford: John Johnson Collection (which among a wide and random variety of interesting leaflets includes material issued by the Women’s Emancipation Union not found anywhere else); Papers of Evelyn Sharp; Papers of H.W. Nevinson.

Bolton Archive Service: Minute books of Bolton Women’s Suffrage Association, 1908-20; Minute books of Bolton Women Citizen’s Association 1923-8; Haslam Papers.

Bristol University Library: Papers of Jane Cobden Unwin.

The British Library, London: Maud Arncliffe Sennett Collection; Archives of Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner and Henry S. King, 1858-1912; Archives of Swan Sonnenschein & Co., 1878-1911; The Times (all on microfilm).

The British Library, London: Additional Manuscripts Collection: Elizabeth Wolstenholme Elmy Papers; Harben/Pankhurst correspondence; Olive Wharry’s Prison Diary; Balfour Papers (correspondence with Christabel Pankhurst and Annie Kenney).

Cambridgeshire County Record Office, Cambridge: in particular Minutes of the Cambridge Women’s Suffrage Association 1884-1930.

Camellia plc, London: papers of Mary Phillips; Minute book of the Central Committee of the National Society for Women’s Suffrage, 1896-8.

Carmarthen Record Office: Minute book of the Carmarthen Women’s Suffrage Society.

Dundee District Archive and Record Centre: Memories of Miss I. Carrie.

Dyrham Park, Avon (The National Trust): diaries of Mary and Emily Blathwayt.

Essex Record Office, Chelmsford: Eliza Vaughan on the Pilgrimage (T/Z 11/27); Miss G.M. Alderman on life in Holloway (T/Z11/27); copy of letter from Anne Knight, Chelmsford, about franchise for women (T/Z 20/47).

Family Record Centre, London: holds volumes containing records, by quarter, of all births, marriages and deaths in England and Wales since 1837. One can also book a link to the very much more efficient Scottish system, which has been computerized. The FRC also holds microfilm of the English and Welsh censuses 1841-91.

Fawcett Library, Guildhall University, London: Autograph letter collection; taped interviews by Brian Harrison; a very wide range of printed and manuscript material relating to individual suffrage societies; microfilms of archives held elsewhere (including, in particular, the Manchester Suffrage Collection, the Suffragette Fellowship Collection (Museum of London) and the Papers of Sylvia Pankhurst (Internationaal Instituut voor Sociale Geschiedenis, Amsterdam); artefacts related to suffrage societies; and the photographic collection, which contains images of a very wide range of suffrage personalities and events.

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The Women's Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide, 1866-1928
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations vi
  • Introduction ix
  • A 1
  • B 24
  • C 90
  • D 156
  • E 182
  • F 212
  • G 235
  • H 256
  • I 299
  • J 303
  • K 313
  • L 331
  • M 363
  • N 434
  • O 472
  • P 485
  • Q 585
  • R 586
  • S 613
  • T 671
  • U 693
  • V 697
  • W 699
  • Y 763
  • Z 766
  • Appendix - The Radical Liberal Family Networks 767
  • Acknowledgements 769
  • Archival Sources 771
  • Select Bibliography 774
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