Lexicography: An Introduction

By Howard Jackson | Go to book overview

5

The New English Dictionary

The popularity of Samuel Johnson’s Dictionary continued into the nineteenth century, when it was joined by a rival, Charles Richardson’s A New Dictionary of the English Language, published in 1836/7. Richardson’s dictionary is significant for its extensive use of illustrative quotations, and its adherence to the rather bizarre ‘philosophical philology’ proposed by Horne Tooke (1736-1812). In The Diversions of Purley (1786, 1805), Tooke had put forward the notion that all words could be traced to primary nouns, or verbs, with a single meaning. His classic example was the word bar, which has the basic meaning of ‘defence’; and he finds this meaning included in words such as barn, baron, barge, bargain, bark. Tooke’s reductionist ideas enjoyed a measure of popularity, and they influenced Richardson’s etymologies, which, needless to say, have much of the fanciful about them. By mid-century both leading dictionaries were considered to be wanting in their coverage of English vocabulary; the observation came from the newly formed Philological Society.


5.1The Philological Society

The Society had been formed in May 1842, ‘for the investigation of the Structure, the Affinities, and the History of Languages; and the Philological Illustration of the Classical Writers of Greece and Rome’. The concern about the lack of coverage by existing dictionaries was expressed in 1857 and related to the vocabulary of the earlier history of English. The Society formed a committee to collect ‘unregistered words’, and instituted the recruitment of volunteer readers to undertake a reading programme for the purpose. The aim was to publish a supplement to existing dictionaries. However, in November of that year, the Society heard two papers by one of the members of its Unregistered Words Committee (the other two members were Herbert Coleridge and Frederick Furnivall), the Dean of Westminster, Richard Chenevix Trench, which were later published under the title On Some Deficiencies in Our English Dictionaries. Dean Trench identified some seven deficiencies and proposed that ‘the only sound basis’ for a dictionary was ‘the historical principle’, by which he meant the new, ‘scientific’ comparative philology that had been developed especially

-47-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Lexicography: An Introduction
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Dictionaries Cited ix
  • 1 - Words 1
  • 2 - Facts about Words 10
  • 3 - The Dictionary 21
  • 4 - The Beginnings 31
  • 5 - The New English Dictionary 47
  • 6 - Up to the Present 61
  • 7 - Users and Uses 74
  • 8 - Meaning in Dictionaries 86
  • 9 - Beyond Definition 101
  • 10 - Etymology 117
  • 11 - Dictionaries for Learners 129
  • 12 - Abandoning the Alphabet 145
  • 13 - Compiling Dictionaries 161
  • 14 - Criticising Dictionaries 173
  • References 184
  • Index 189
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 198

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.