Science and Social Science: An Introduction

By Malcolm Williams | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

Many people wittingly or unwittingly helped me in the writing of this book. For conversations, ideas, suggestions and material support I would like to thank Dave Byrne, Joan Chandler, Ken Connolly, Neil Cooper, Steve Fuller and Matt Treadwell. Dave Byrne, Elizabeth Ettorre, Robin Hendry, Liz Hodgkinson, Tim May and two anonymous referees read various chapters and made many helpful recommendations. Especial thanks to Tim for his encouragement, to Robin who saved me from too many scientific faux pas (though of course the responsibility for particular interpretations, or remaining errors, is mine alone) and to Liz, John and Laura for their love and support. Finally I would like to express my gratitude to Mari Shullaw, Ruth Graham, Shankari Sanmuganathan and the production team at Routledge for guiding this book from idea to actuality.

-ix-

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Science and Social Science: An Introduction
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Where Did Science Come From? 8
  • Suggested Further Reading 27
  • 2 - Science and Its Method 28
  • Suggested Further Reading 48
  • 3 - Social Science as Science 49
  • Suggested Further Reading 69
  • 4 - Against Science 70
  • Suggested Further Reading 86
  • 5 - Against Science in Social Science 87
  • Suggested Further Reading 103
  • 6 - Science, Objectivity and Ethics 104
  • Suggested Further Reading 121
  • 7 - New Science and New Social Science 122
  • Suggested Further Reading 141
  • 8 - Conclusion: The Science of Social Science 142
  • Glossary 150
  • References 154
  • Name Index 168
  • Subject Index 172
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