A Handbook of Media and Communication Research: Qualitative and Quantitative Methodologies

By Klaus Bruhn Jensen | Go to book overview

Preface
This book covers the state of media and communication research - its development, present status, and future potential. It is addressed to students, researchers and media professionals seeking an in-depth treatment of the field. In recent years, media studies have gone through a process of convergence between social sciences and humanities, quantitative and qualitative approaches. This book presents the diverse theoretical sources of current media studies and provides examples of different research techniques. It also outlines the profile of this academic field, as it relates to the rest of the academy and to contemporary society. To serve as an accessible yet comprehensive handbook, the volume includes a number of features:
examples of the main types of media analysis, including production research, textual analysis and audience studies;
reviews and comparisons of the central traditions of theory and methodology;
resources and extensive references for the planning of empirical research projects;
keywords and cross-references;
abstracts, as well as figures and tables summarizing the main points of each chapter.

In preparing the volume, I have had the privilege of cooperating with a number of competent and generous people. First of all, I am grateful to the contributors to the volume, who agreed to join me in the process of developing this reference work. Simultaneously, I have benefited from many discussions with, and suggestions from, colleagues at the University of Copenhagen and at the University of Oslo. While drafting the text, I have drawn much inspiration as a member of two research programs: Global Media Cultures (1999 to 2001) at the University of Copenhagen (http://global.media.ku.dk) and DIWA (1999 to 2003) (Design and use of Interactive Web Applications - http://www.diwa.dk), a joint project of four Danish universities. Svein Østerud has been a continually constructive partner in debates on methodology for more than ten years. Special thanks are due to Peter Dahlgren and Søren Kjørup who both took the time to read and offer constructive criticisms on earlier drafts of several chapters.

My deepest thanks go to Ghita - my wife, my friend, and a real human being.

Klaus Bruhn Jensen

Copenhagen, April 2001


NOTE

Key concepts and discussions of key terms are indicated by a marginal note beside their first place of mention in the text.

The symbol ◄ in the text indicates a cross reference to the preceding text which can be found below.

The symbol ► at the foot of a column indicates the cross reference linked to its mention in the above column.

While the publishers have made every effort to contact copyright holders of material used, they would be grateful to hear from any they may have been unable to locate in order to rectify any omissions in subsequent printings of this volume.

-xi-

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A Handbook of Media and Communication Research: Qualitative and Quantitative Methodologies
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • Part I - History 13
  • 2 - The Humanities in Media and Communication Research 15
  • 3 - Media, Culture and Modern Times 40
  • Part II - Systematics 59
  • 4 - The Production of Media Fiction 62
  • 5 - The Production of News 78
  • 6 - The Study of International News 91
  • 7 - Discourses of Fact 98
  • 8 - Mediated Fiction 117
  • 9 - Media Effects 138
  • 10 - Media Reception 156
  • 11 - Contexts, Cultures, and Computers 171
  • 12 - History, Media and Communication 191
  • Part III - Practice 207
  • 13 - The Quantitative Research Process 209
  • 14 - The Qualitative Research Process 235
  • 15 - The Complementarity of Qualitative and Quantitative Methodologies in Media and Communication Research 254
  • 16 - The Social Origins and Uses of Media and Communication Research 273
  • References 294
  • Index 326
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