A Handbook of Media and Communication Research: Qualitative and Quantitative Methodologies

By Klaus Bruhn Jensen | Go to book overview

PART I

History
SOURCES OF MEDIA AND COMMUNICATION RESEARCHMedia and communication research has developed from a long heritage of diverse scientific disciplines to address new conditions of communication in modern society. The two chapters in Part I present and assess the contributions of the humanities and the social sciences - the two ‘faculties’ or areas of inquiry which have been the main sources of theoretical concepts and analytical procedures. As a preview, the following topics indicate the scope and focus of the field in its present configuration:
Media and communication. The center of interest in the field are the technological media, but because they are examined as means of communication, they lend themselves to concepts and forms of analysis which have been derived from both oral and literate forms of communication down through history. And, because the media are studied in their social and cultural contexts, most of the research questions that have been developed by disciplines such as sociology and anthropology have proven their relevance for media studies, as well. ‘Media’ and ‘communication, ’ in addition, are currently being redefined in the light of computer-mediated communication.
Humanities and social sciences. The modern humanities can be traced from the early nineteenth century; the social sciences date from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, when they separated institutionally from other ‘human sciences.’ During this entire period, the two areas of inquiry have been in contact, and frequently in dialogue. However, it was in the post-1945 period that specific components of each were brought together in the emerging field of media studies.
Field or discipline? It remains an open question whether these contributions have merged sufficiently to constitute a traditional ‘discipline, ’ as defined by its subject matter and consensual methods, as well as by its permanent institutional status. Several chapters in the volume address the question, and Chapter 16 elaborates on the current role of media studies in the wider society.
Convergence. While leaving the question of disciplinary status open, this volume notes that a convergence between humanistic and social-scientific approaches has been ongoing in recent decades. The volume describes different elements and stages of this process, and indicates some possible lines of development for future research.

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A Handbook of Media and Communication Research: Qualitative and Quantitative Methodologies
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • Part I - History 13
  • 2 - The Humanities in Media and Communication Research 15
  • 3 - Media, Culture and Modern Times 40
  • Part II - Systematics 59
  • 4 - The Production of Media Fiction 62
  • 5 - The Production of News 78
  • 6 - The Study of International News 91
  • 7 - Discourses of Fact 98
  • 8 - Mediated Fiction 117
  • 9 - Media Effects 138
  • 10 - Media Reception 156
  • 11 - Contexts, Cultures, and Computers 171
  • 12 - History, Media and Communication 191
  • Part III - Practice 207
  • 13 - The Quantitative Research Process 209
  • 14 - The Qualitative Research Process 235
  • 15 - The Complementarity of Qualitative and Quantitative Methodologies in Media and Communication Research 254
  • 16 - The Social Origins and Uses of Media and Communication Research 273
  • References 294
  • Index 326
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