A Handbook of Media and Communication Research: Qualitative and Quantitative Methodologies

By Klaus Bruhn Jensen | Go to book overview

16

The social origins and usesof media and communication research

Klaus Bruhn Jensen
• a presentation of the several types of ‘theory’ which connect research with social practice
• a review of the normative theories of media
• a description of media and communication research as a social institution
• a comparison of the main applications of media research in policy and politics
• a discussion of both ethics and logistics as aspects of the relations between researchers, the academic community, respondents, and wider social communities.

THEORIES INTO PRACTICE

Making public

This final chapter returns to a number of the issues which motivate media students and researchers in the first place. Indeed, why study the media? (Silverstone 1999). Individual researchers are prompted, in part, by the same concerns which bring major economic and political agents to focus on the area. The modern media are sources of power as well as of meaning - mediated meanings can have powerful social consequences. Accordingly, this chapter examines the three-way relationship between the media, research, and the rest of the social system. Media studies, like their object of analysis, originate from a particular social and historical setting. Part of the relevance of media studies is that they may contribute to the social conditions under which communication will take place in the future.

Like the media themselves, then, university departments and other research organizations may be understood theoretically as institutions-to-think-with, enabling (second-order) reflexivity about the role of media in society.1 In offering their perspectives, researchers participate in a double hermeneutic (Giddens 1984): they reinterpret the ‘lay theories’ (Furnham 1988) of ‘ordinary’ social agents, and feed those reinterpretations back into society. For example, citizens’ lay theories of the category of ‘public opinion’ vary widely (Herbst 1993), may differ from those of political and media theorists, but are, nevertheless, informed over time by scientific theory, in part, through media. In addition, programming decisions by television executives have been centrally shaped by new research on the ‘active’ audience (Eastman 1998).

Alvesson and Sköldberg (2000:248) have gone on to suggest several additional types of hermeneutics. For instance, a ‘triple’ hermeneutics would be performed by critical theory with

the specific aim of exposing and ending relations of social dominance. The general point of hermeneutics in this regard is that all social

1 media research as second-order institution-to-thinkwith - Chapter 1, p. 6

-273-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Handbook of Media and Communication Research: Qualitative and Quantitative Methodologies
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • Part I - History 13
  • 2 - The Humanities in Media and Communication Research 15
  • 3 - Media, Culture and Modern Times 40
  • Part II - Systematics 59
  • 4 - The Production of Media Fiction 62
  • 5 - The Production of News 78
  • 6 - The Study of International News 91
  • 7 - Discourses of Fact 98
  • 8 - Mediated Fiction 117
  • 9 - Media Effects 138
  • 10 - Media Reception 156
  • 11 - Contexts, Cultures, and Computers 171
  • 12 - History, Media and Communication 191
  • Part III - Practice 207
  • 13 - The Quantitative Research Process 209
  • 14 - The Qualitative Research Process 235
  • 15 - The Complementarity of Qualitative and Quantitative Methodologies in Media and Communication Research 254
  • 16 - The Social Origins and Uses of Media and Communication Research 273
  • References 294
  • Index 326
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 340

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.