Promoting Assessment as Learning: Improving the Learning Process

By Ruth Dann | Go to book overview

Chapter 6

Building a framework for self-assessment

Introduction

Having briefly outlined some origins for pupil self-assessment and examined one primary school’s attempt to develop a self-assessment initiative, this chapter builds on Chapter 5, aiming to focus more specifically on a framework for self-assessment as well as offering practical considerations for its future development. Of particular concern is the relationship and balance between assessment, which seeks to establish and measure pupil performance in relation to objective criteria, and assessment which directly seeks to influence and develop a pupil’s sense of personal identity which includes his/her understanding of self as life-long learner and achiever.

In exploring the possible learning foundations for National Curriculum related assessments (Chapter 2) it seemed that the pupils’ role in the assessment process was active in terms of their capacity as test takers or curriculum participants, but passive in the sense of their being directly influenced by the processes or outcomes of assessment. Increasingly, evidence suggests that pupils are far more greatly influenced by their experiences of assessment than is specifically recognised (Pollard et al 2000). Even when the focus is on formative assessment, teachers tend to regard any impact on pupils mainly in terms of intervention and mediation. Torrance and Pryor (1998) offer a different view. They suggest that pupils need to make sense of assessment in order for their learning to advance. Pupils need to understand something of the gap between where they are in their learning and where they might be. Although the next step of learning may be teacher constructed or nationally prescribed, if it is not grasped by the pupil, as an aspiration, next step, target or goal, then it is unlikely to be realised. The advocation of teacher/pupil collaboration, to

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Promoting Assessment as Learning: Improving the Learning Process
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures vi
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 - Pupil Learning and Assessment 8
  • Chapter 3 - Formative Assessment 28
  • Chapter 4 - Constructing Learning Contexts from Testing Regimes 47
  • Chapter 5 - Pupil Self-Assessment: a Case Study 73
  • Chapter 6 - Building a Framework for Self-Assessment 111
  • Chapter 7 - Assessment as Learning 142
  • Bibliography 154
  • Index 162
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