Chapter 4

How British is British food?

Allison James

Since Elizabeth David first published her book about Mediterranean cooking in 1950, four years before food rationing ended, the reticence and conservatism of the British palate appears to have been in sharp decline (Mennell 1985). 1 The cookery columns which had become regular features in newspapers and magazines by the 1950s gave way to a more serious form of food journalism in the 1960s and, since the mid-1970s, specialist radio and television, which have food as their topic, have begun to be broadcast. Amidst this burgeoning industry, interest in ‘foreign’ food seemed by the 1990s to have emerged triumphant: chicken tikka was recorded as a favoured filling for the British Rail sandwich, and chicken tikka masala, chilli con carne and lasagne had become bestsellers in Tesco’s pre-cooked food range (The Sunday Times 23 September 1991).

But although these trends might seem to indicate that an irrevocable change in British food traditions had taken place, by the early 1990s there were also signs of movement in the opposite direction. Alongside the enthusiasm for ‘foreign’ food was an increased parochialising of taste, as evidenced in the loud championing of ‘gutsy, unpretentious’ food (Bati 1991) and the flotation of Harry Ramsden’s fish and chip shop on the Stock Exchange (Young 1989).

This chapter explores these apparent changes in the patterning of food preferences in Britain through examining representations of food to be found in the popular press in the early 1990s—newspapers, magazines and food journalism—and considers what kind of impact foreign food could be said to be having on British food traditions at that time. Did it register a massive dislocation in food habits, so that now it is no longer possible for the British

-71-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Food, Health, and Identity
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 280

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.