1

The Extent of the Problem of AIDS and HIV in Adolescents

Adolescent AIDS has been the subject of relatively little attention since the AIDS pandemic began. The majority of concern has been given to the more obvious presence of adult cases of AIDS and their implications. Perhaps this is as it should be; AIDS first came to our attention among adults, and the bulk of AIDS cases appear in adults. After adults, AIDS cases among children have received the most attention. AIDS babies born to HIV-positive mothers or infected by the virus in their mother’s milk are the embodiment of the innocent “victim” of the AIDS crisis. Helpless to aid themselves, they deserve and receive the sympathy of the world. Caught between the overwhelming manifestation of AIDS in adults and the compassionate portrayal of infants with AIDS are a vast number of adolescents at risk of HIV infection whose peril has been largely ignored by the media and by their parents and teachers. Grouped with either adults or children, or sometimes not present in the equation at all, the needs and responses specific to youths have fallen through the cracks of AIDS prevention and care.

-1-

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Teaching AIDS
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • 1 - The Extent of the Problem of AIDS and HIV in Adolescents 1
  • 2 - Preparing an AIDS Education Program 14
  • 3 - Facts and Information 35
  • 4 - Age-Appropriate Information 54
  • 5 - Individual and Group Activities to Uncover the Facts 69
  • 6 - Skills to Change Student Attitudes toward AIDS and Risky Behavior 99
  • 7 - Modeling the Skills 125
  • 8 - Skill-Building Classroom Activities 151
  • Notes 167
  • Bibliography 173
  • Index 191
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