Origins of the Cold War: An International History

By Melvyn P. Leffler; David S. Painter | Go to book overview

NOTES

From Charles Gati, “The Democratic Interlude in Postwar Hungary: Eastern Europe before Cominform,” Survey, 28 (Summer 1984): 99-134. Reprinted and abridged by permission of the author.

1
Cf. Geir Lundestad, The American Non-Policy Towards Eastern Europe, 1943-1947 (New York: Humanities Press, 1975), especially 435-50.
2
Fernando Claudin, The Communist Movement: From Comintern to Cominform (New York: Monthly Review Press, 1975), pt 2, 336.
3
The term “bogus coalition” was first used by Hugh Seton-Watson in The East European Revolution (3rd edn, New York: Praeger, 1956), 170.
4
Information by Zoltan Vas, Matyas Rakosi’s close associate for over thirty years who spent the war years (1941-4) in Moscow in Rakosi’s entourage. Stalin’s “Polish tradeoff” was also indicated by Gero (note 5 below).
5
As quoted in Mihaly Korom, Magyarorszag ideiglenes nemzeti kormanya es a fegyverszunet (1944-1945) [Hungary’s Provisional National Government and the Armistice (1944-1945)] (Budapest: Akademiai Kiado, 1981), 390-1.
6
That the Communist takeover in Hungary should occur in “no less than 10 to 15 years” was a key feature of Communist planning for the postwar years. The phrase itself was repeated in all of my interviews with high-ranking Communist officials, including Vas, Ferenc Donath, Miklos Vasarhelyi, and others. When asked at a May 1945 party aktiv, Rakosi also used the phrase. See Gyula Schopflin, “A Magyar Kommunista Part utja, 1945-1950” [The Path of the Hungarian Communist Party, 1945-1950], Latohatar (Munich), 7(4-5) (July-October 1955): 239.
7
Winston S. Churchill, The Second World War, Vol. 6: Triumph and Tragedy (Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin, 1953), 227-9. A copy of the agreement is in Churchill’s file at the Public Records Office in London (PREM 3/66/7, PRO). For an excellent summary and perceptive interpretation, see Vojtech Mastny, Russia’s Road to the Cold War (New York: Columbia University Press, 1979), 207-12. See also Albert Reis, “The Churchill-Stalin Percentages Agreement,” American Historical Review, 83(2) (April 1978): 368-87.
8
The British record of these two meetings is at the Public Records Office: “Record of Meeting at the Kremlin, Moscow, on 10th October, 1944 at 7 p.m.” (PREM 3/343/2) and “Record of Meeting at the Kremlin, Moscow, on 11th October, 1944, at 3 p.m.” (PREM 3/434/2). Brief reference to these meetings is made in Anthony Eden, The Reckoning (Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin, 1965), 559-60.
9
Eden, The Reckoning, 560.
10
Mastny, Russia’s Road, 210-11.
11
The most detailed report on these meetings is in Korom, Magyarorszag, 243-60. See also Balint Szabo, Nepi demokracia es forradalomelmelet [People’s Democracy and Revolutionary Theory] (Budapest: Kossuth, 1974), 75-105. For a fine summary in English based

-196-

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