6
Up from Hunger

"Sir, I'm hungry!" pleaded a five-year old boy in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

He had approached Bernard Confer and Leslie Weber, both Lutheran executives engaged in world relief. They turned, and as Weber tells it, "I had no doubt about his being hungry. He wore a single cloth garment and his eyes bulged. I reached in my pocket and gave him a coin. Soon there were other children and my Ethiopian money was gone. My friend Confer commented, 'You have helped these children today, but who will help them tomorrow?'"

Who will help them tomorrow?

Or to ask the question underlying that one: How can we deal with the causes of hunger? What are its long-range remedies?

Because hunger springs from poverty, gains against hunger require development, the kind of development that enables people to climb above the most wretched forms of poverty.


The Development Struggle

Despite obstacles, seemingly unsurmountable at times, poor countries are not yet locked into despair. They still hope to work their way out of hunger, but doing so requires a combination of heroic effort on their part and greater cooperation on the part of other countries, including and especially our own.

Fortunately we are not starting from scratch. During the past three decades, while most of today's poor countries achieved their independence, a great range of development efforts took place. Results have been mixed, because the efforts were not

-58-

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Bread for the World
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vi
  • Preface ix
  • Part I - The Struggle for Bread 1
  • 1 - Hunger 3
  • 2 - Food Production 14
  • 3 - Population 27
  • Part II - Bread and Justice 37
  • 4 - Haves" and "Have Nots 39
  • 5 - Environment, Resources and Growth 47
  • 6 - Up from Hunger 58
  • Part III - The Need for a U.S. Commitment on Hunger 71
  • 7 - The Rediscovery of America 73
  • 8 - Hunger Usa 82
  • 9 - Trade: a Hunger Issue 90
  • 10 - The Role Of Investment Abroad 102
  • 11 - Foreign Aid: A Case for Reform 110
  • 12 - Let Them Eat Missiles 122
  • Part IV - A Program for Action 131
  • 13 - A Citizens' Movement 133
  • 14 - What Can I Do? 143
  • The Right to Food - A Statement of Policy (provisional Draft) By Bread for the World 165
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