The Handbook of Environmental Education

By Joy Palmer; Philip Neal | Go to book overview

Chapter 7

Planning and practice at the secondary level

That part of the lecture billed variously as ‘questions’, ‘discussion’, ‘comment from the floor’, had come. The talk on environmental education as a cross-curricular theme had gone well—the transparencies had been clearly visible—not too many nor too few—they had well illustrated the views being put. Overhead projector acetates had summarized the points made and were legible for all the audience, even those at the back of the room. Their content was brief and precise and as copies were available there had been little need to take notes. The first question—the second—the third—all were relevant and positively answered apparently to the satisfaction of the questioner. ‘One last question, please’ asked the chair—it came:

‘How can I do what you suggest when I have to follow the set examination syllabus, the timetable prevents my going out on even limited field work and my head teacher will not introduce a new subject?’—the latter despite the fact that the talk had emphasized that environmental education is not a subject but a curriculum area and requires no extra lesson time, only a different approach.

Content—time—extra work—lack of priority in school: all brought to a head in this one question—had all the input been in vain? To the questioner his school organization prevented the straightforward implementation of environmental education. Some encouraging words in return but nothing more in the time available to convince him it could be done. The niggle is that this questioner probably represents the views of a majority of teachers interested and willing to further environmental education but lacking local guidance.

We do not pretend to have all the answers where the secondary phase is concerned but, perhaps, the experiences of some of our colleagues and ourselves will cast a little light. Cross-curricular environmental education can become an essential part of the school curriculum without turning the whole establishment upside down. This has been done successfully in schools throughout the UK and across the world. What

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The Handbook of Environmental Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Part I - Setting the Scene 1
  • Chapter 1 - Concern for the Environment 3
  • Chapter 2 - Environmental Education: International Development and Progress 11
  • Chapter 3 - Threads of a Theme: Principles and Structure 18
  • Chapter 4 - The National Curriculum 23
  • Part II - Environmental Education in Schools 35
  • Chapter 5 - Planning and Practice at the Primary Level 37
  • Chapter 6 - Primary to Secondary: a Time of Transition 63
  • Chapter 7 - Planning and Practice at the Secondary Level 67
  • Chapter 8 - The Out-Of-School (Field Work) Approach 94
  • Part III - Practicalities 103
  • Chapter 9 - Developing and Coordinating a School Policy for Environmental Education 105
  • Chapter 10 - Implementing a School Policy for Environmental Education 128
  • Chapter 11 - Assessment and Evaluation 152
  • Part IV - Resources 161
  • Appendices 215
  • Appendix A 217
  • Appendix B 221
  • Appendix C 223
  • Appendix D 225
  • Appendix E 227
  • Appendix F 229
  • Appendix G 233
  • Appendix H 255
  • Appendix J 258
  • Appendix K 260
  • References 262
  • Index 264
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