Compact Cities: Sustainable Urban Forms for Developing Countries

By Mike Jenks; Rod Burgess | Go to book overview

Claudio C. Acioly Jr.

Can Urban Management Deliver the Sustainable City?

Guided Densification in Brazil versus Informal Compactness in Egypt

Introduction

A recent study of urban densities in developing countries, conducted for the 1996 United Nations Conference on Human Settlements (Acioly and Davidson, 1996), concluded that there is no universal recipe for urban densities in terms of an ideal, or most appropriate density, particularly for residential development. Several case studies have shown that what is regarded as a high or a low density, and what is an acceptable density, differ between continents and countries, and even within cities and neighbourhoods. However, there was evidence that a general process of change was leading to more compact cities, though often in the face of considerable resistance. The study revealed that costs of low-density solutions are increasingly recognised. Case studies in Brazil and India showed that government policies, plans and development control instruments can shape cities and densities in a way which optimises infrastructure, municipal services, land and public resources (Acioly and Davidson, 1996; 1998).

Subsequent research in Cairo triggered the idea for this chapter—a comparative analysis of the process of compaction in Egyptian cities and the process of densification found in selected Brazilian cities. The main objectives of the chapter are to analyse the different modes of densification, to highlight the advantages and disadvantages of densely occupied urban environments, and to assess their outcomes from the point of view of sustainable urban development.

In Egypt, informal urbanisation and the illegal extension of buildings exacerbate the positive and negative effects of extreme compaction. This phenomenon is normally the result of a spontaneous process coupled with inadequate housing and urban policies. By contrast, the process in Brazil is steered by active and enabled local governments using a range of urban management instruments that result in physical compactness and the optimal use of infrastructure and land.

In the first part of this chapter the problems and opportunities presented by compact urban environments in Cairo and Giza are analysed. This reveals the particular ways in which informal development in Egypt leads to compactness, and attention is focused on various aspects of urban development such as urban

-127-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Compact Cities: Sustainable Urban Forms for Developing Countries
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 356

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.