Compact Cities: Sustainable Urban Forms for Developing Countries

By Mike Jenks; Rod Burgess | Go to book overview

Giulietta Fadda, Paola Jirón and Adriana Allen

Views from the Urban Fringe:

Habitat, Quality of Life and Gender in Santiago, Chile

Introduction

In recent years, a broad range of contributions has fuelled the debate on the compact city. They have explored its merits and defects from an environmental, economic, social and physical point of view. However, particularly in the South, less attention has been given to the perception women and men have of the different quality of life 1 and livelihood opportunities that are attached to living in the inner or outer city. In this context, the freedom to choose a place to live is often highly dependent on income levels, state policies and, increasingly, on market forces.

Over the past 20 years in Chile, urban planning policies have contributed to a process of urban sprawl and the expansion of Santiago’s ecological footprint. Between 1979 and 1995 the city’s urban area expanded from 35,000 to 65,000 hectares. During this period, the population increased from approximately 4 million to 4.8 million inhabitants. Thus the urban area increased by 85% and the population by 20%. Simultaneously, Chilean housing policies have managed recently to provide a significant number of housing solutions but this has only been achieved through a rapid expansion of the city’s built area. Developments on the urban periphery often cause additional burdens both to local authorities (costs of incorporating amenities, infrastructure and facilities) and to local residents, who now have to spend more time and resources to get access to the city as a place for exchange.

This chapter discusses the impact that an extended city can have on the quality of life of people in low-income sectors. It explores, on the basis of research findings from the District of Pudahuel in Santiago, the different factors that inform people’s perception of their living conditions from a gender perspective. The main aim is to draw to the attention of policy makers the diversity of needs, views and realities of those who directly benefit from, or are affected by, the impact of extended cities. This will help to further inform the compact versus dispersed city debate.

The general move towards dispersal and the location of growth on the peripheries or fringes of cities is becoming a world-wide phenomenon. Indeed, the formation of vast and ever-expanding metropolitan regions is often portrayed as

-167-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Compact Cities: Sustainable Urban Forms for Developing Countries
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 356

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.