Compact Cities: Sustainable Urban Forms for Developing Countries

By Mike Jenks; Rod Burgess | Go to book overview

Notes
1.
The Western cities in the study were Hamburg, Frankfurt, Zurich, Stockholm, Brussels, Paris, London, Munich, Copenhagen, Vienna, Amsterdam, Houston, Phoenix, Detroit, Denver, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Boston, Washington, Chicago, New York, Portland, Sacramento, San Diego, Sydney, Adelaide, Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth, Canberra, Calgary, Edmonton, Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, Vancouver, and Winnipeg.

Acknowledgements

I gratefully acknowledge the invaluable contributions of Dr Jeff Kenworthy, the team supervisor, and of other students in ISTP at Murdoch University. They are Dr Felix Laube; Dr Chamlong Poboon; Mr Tamim Raad and Mr Benedicto Guia, Jr. Many thanks must also go to the many people in government agencies and other institutions who have given their time to provide much of the vast amount of data behind the analysis presented here. Part of this research on Asian cities was supported with a grant from the Asia Research Centre at Murdoch University and with a travel grant from the School of Social Sciences at Murdoch University, which are gratefully acknowledged. A number of specific data items were collected with the support of a World Bank research contract.


References
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