Relating Architecture to Landscape

By Jan Birksted | Go to book overview

Notes
1
Alan Blanc, Landscape Construction and Detailing, London: B.T. Batsford, 1996, p. vii.
2
Elisabeth Beazley, Design and Detail of the Space Between Buildings, London: The Architectural Press, 1960, pp. 11-12.
3
Beazley’s book was republished in 1990 as Beazley’s Design and Detail of the Space Between Buildings, substantially expanded by Angi and Alan Pinder; the new edition does however lack many of the original inspiring photographs which helped to explain the issues.
4
Christopher Tunnard, Gardens in the Modern Landscape, London: The Architectural Press, 1938, pp. 77,78.
5
E. Beazley, Designed to Live In, London: George Allen & Unwin, 1962, p. 104.
6
F.R. Yerbury et al. ‘Round the table; round the world’, The Architect’s Journal, 109 (1949), pp. 70-82.
7
‘International Federation of Landscape Architects’, Journal of the Institute of Landscape Architects, No. 25 (1952), p. 14.
8
For a fuller account see: T. Andersson, ‘Erik Glemme and the Stockholm Park System’, in M. Treib, Modern Landscape Architecture; A Critical Review, Cambridge, Mass, and London: The MIT Press, 1992, pp. 114-133.
9
E.L. Bird, ‘Swedish architecture in 1946. Part III: Stockholm’s Parks and Gardens’, Journal of the Royal Institute of British Architects, 54 (1947), pp. 410-415.
10
Ibid. This type of lighting never took off greatly in Britain, where budgets for public space have been progressively reduced since the Second World War, although Scandinavian types were adopted at the Span developments. In Germany such lighting has gained popularity in both public parks and gardens, and became well known abroad through post-war garden shows.
11
With the increase of the garden for leisure purposes during the 1930s the demand for furniture increased. Firms especially dedicated to the purpose marketed garden furniture. Well-designed furniture could now be obtained from shops. Heals in London, for example, marketed furniture designed by Christopher Nicholson; the designer Sybil Colefax also designed a range of garden furniture (see Geoffrey Jellicoe, Garden Decoration and Ornament for Smaller Houses, London: Country Life, 1936, pp. 82-83).
12
H.F. Clark, ‘Space between buildings; the landscaping of Stockholm’s parks’, The Architectural Review, 102(1947), pp. 189-198.
13
W.F. Koppeschaar, ‘Bloemurnen; een Zweeds idee’, De boomkweekerij, 2 (1946/7), p. 199; J. Muntjewerf, W.van Eijkern, ‘Bloembakken’, Beplantingen en Boomkwekerij, 23 (1967), pp. 75-79.
14
Gordon Russell, ‘The design of garden accessories’, Journal of the Institute of Landscape Architects, March 1954, pp. 2-4.
15
G.N. Brandt, ‘Tivolis Springvandterrasse’, Havekunst, 24 (1943), pp. 69-76.
16
The bowls were included for example in: Sylvia Crowe, Garden Design, London: Country Life, 1958, p. 124v.; K. Hoffmann, Garten und Haus, Stuttgart: Julius Hoffmann Verlag, 1956, p. 146.
17
The Architectural Review, 102 (1947), p. 190.

-75-

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Relating Architecture to Landscape
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 6
  • Section One 13
  • Introduction 15
  • Introduction - To Modern Gardens (1953) 16
  • Section Two 39
  • Introduction 41
  • Time and Temporality in Japanese Gardens 43
  • Notes 57
  • Some Recommended Books on Japanese Gardens 58
  • Detailing and Materials of Outdoor Space: the Scandinavian Example 59
  • Notes 75
  • Playing with Artifice: Roberto Burle Marx’s Gardens 77
  • Section Three 103
  • Introduction 105
  • External Interior/Internal Exterior Spaces at the Maeght Foundation 106
  • 1 - Plan of Prague Castle 120
  • References 157
  • The Re-Invention of the Site 158
  • Notes 172
  • Section Four 175
  • Introduction 177
  • Hans Scharoun, Schminke House, LöBau, Saxony 1932-33: Garden by Herta Hammerbacher and Hermann Mattern 178
  • Notes 193
  • 1 - Road to Acropolis, Sketch 194
  • Notes 204
  • Notes 227
  • Section Five 229
  • Introduction 231
  • The Necessity of Invention: Bernard Lassus’s Garden Landscapes 232
  • Notes 243
  • The Prospect at Dungeness: Derek Jarman’s Garden 244
  • Notes 258
  • Building in Nature 261
  • Contributors 281
  • Index 285
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