Relating Architecture to Landscape

By Jan Birksted | Go to book overview

Notes
1
The opening of ‘Das Haus im Garten’, in Mattern (1960), p. 92, my translation.
2
Alfred Schinz, ‘Die Jahre mit Scharoun 1947-1955’, Baukultur no. 3/4, 1993 pp. 30-33, my translation.
3
The garden is credited to Hammerbacher in the primary Scharoun source, Pfankuch (1974). Kürvers reports discussions with Mattern over the winter garden and also includes a reconstructed garden plan in his chapter of Risselada (1997).
4
The acoustician of the Philharmonie, Lothar Cremer, told me in 1978 that Scharoun was the most rewarding architect he had ever worked for because he could always somehow find a way to answer the acoustician’s demands without compromising his own ideas.
5
According to Adolf Behne, writing in Deutsche Bauzeitung 16/1/35, vol. 3 p. 53, it cost 13000 Reichsmarks.
6
In the post-war years Scharoun and his co-workers saw the transition from perspective to ‘aperspective’ as part of a profound and far-reaching change of consciousness sweeping across society as a whole. The term was given definition in the book Ursprung und Gegenwart by Jean Gebser, which appeared in 1949 and was avidly read in German intellectual circles. A German philosopher who fled to Switzerland during the Nazi period, Gebser had been working on a general cultural theory since the 1920s, and finally put together the whole story in the 1940s. He explained the development of human culture in a series of phases, called archaic, magical, mythical, mental, and integral. The integral phase was supposed to mark the overthrow of dualistic thinking and the reincorporation of the mythical and magical along with the rationalism of the Enlightenment. The change from perspectivity to aperspectivity was very much the central idea of the book, the Leitmotiv that ran through everything. Aperspectivity was the characteristic of the integral phase, in contrast with the perspective, which arose with the Renaissance, or the unperspective that preceded it. It ushered in the new age, and Gebser attempted to show how it manifested itself not only in painting and architecture, but also in music, the sciences, and law. This is explored more extensively in my monograph on Scharoun (Jones 1995) and in the article ‘From the Neoclassical axis to aperspective space’ published in The Architectural Review March 1988.
7
According to the revised worklist in Pfankuch (1993).
8
Verbal information from Scharoun’s assistant Chen Kuan Lee, from an interview of 1984.
9
This he achieved most spectacularly in his garden to the Peyron house at Glumslöv, Sweden of 1956.
10
For the full set of drawings see Jones (1995) p. 88.
11
The fine glazing was unfortunately destroyed in the war and replaced with larger panes, so is not seen in modern photographs.
12
For Scharoun’s definition of Stadtlandschaft and his description of Prague see my Hans Scharoun (Jones 1995, pp. 109-111)
13
Its members were Wils Ebert, Peter Friedrich, Ludmilla Herzenstein, Reinhold Lingner, Scharoun, Louise Seitz, Selman Selmanagic, and Herbert Weinberger.
14
The Berlin Plant exhibition is best documented in Geist, Johann Friedrich, and Kürvers, Klaus. Das Berlier Mietshaus 1945-89. (3rd vol. of a series) Munich: Prestel Verlag, 1989.
15
See Mattern, ‘Rekonstruktion historischer Gärten’ in Mattern 1960, pp. 72-73.
16
For a more detailed version see my Hans Scharoun (Jones 1995, pp. 187-191, 222)

-193-

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Relating Architecture to Landscape
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 6
  • Section One 13
  • Introduction 15
  • Introduction - To Modern Gardens (1953) 16
  • Section Two 39
  • Introduction 41
  • Time and Temporality in Japanese Gardens 43
  • Notes 57
  • Some Recommended Books on Japanese Gardens 58
  • Detailing and Materials of Outdoor Space: the Scandinavian Example 59
  • Notes 75
  • Playing with Artifice: Roberto Burle Marx’s Gardens 77
  • Section Three 103
  • Introduction 105
  • External Interior/Internal Exterior Spaces at the Maeght Foundation 106
  • 1 - Plan of Prague Castle 120
  • References 157
  • The Re-Invention of the Site 158
  • Notes 172
  • Section Four 175
  • Introduction 177
  • Hans Scharoun, Schminke House, LöBau, Saxony 1932-33: Garden by Herta Hammerbacher and Hermann Mattern 178
  • Notes 193
  • 1 - Road to Acropolis, Sketch 194
  • Notes 204
  • Notes 227
  • Section Five 229
  • Introduction 231
  • The Necessity of Invention: Bernard Lassus’s Garden Landscapes 232
  • Notes 243
  • The Prospect at Dungeness: Derek Jarman’s Garden 244
  • Notes 258
  • Building in Nature 261
  • Contributors 281
  • Index 285
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