Relating Architecture to Landscape

By Jan Birksted | Go to book overview

Peter Salter


Building in Nature

Much of contemporary architecture appears brittle in its ideas of ‘accommodation’ and use of materials. It is determined by value judgements, removed from the physical qualities of landscape and the material’s inherent qualities and workmanship. We need to search for a wider basis for thinking about making architecture. As a teacher, I am interested in landscape, because the issues it raises for architecture are clear and demanding. It provides a grounding, a centre of gravity—an opportunity for a more accurate and generous architecture.

In working with Landform Geography we are working with what is physical and particular, where there is a clarity to the issues of site, territory-making, and inhabitation responsive to that site. This sets up an architecture that is sensitive to ageing and weathering, and to aspects of time in relation to the cycles of erosion and deposition. These processes become strategic tools for determining the spatial arrangement of enclosure and the displacement of light. Through looking at detail, we become sensitive, not only to the channelling of water and run-off but to the material working of the building, its wear corresponding in some way to the habitual use and pleasure of that building.

In the late 1980s I took my students to Inisheer, an island off the west coast of Ireland. We went to build a curragh, the traditional tarred fishing boat of that region, and the only means of transport for these island people before the arrival of the aeroplane and cargo ship. Our interest did not imply any sense of nostalgia for the vernacular or for the past, but rather a recognition of the boat as a tool and a catalyst of ideas from which to explore a range of architectural issues and structures. Before the building of the airstrip and the quayside, the curragh transported goods and technologies to the islands. If such imports could not be brought on this rowing-boat, the island people had to ‘invent’ different ways of living and particular technologies based on the island’s geography. So the curragh became a measure of the place.

Four families inhabited this limestone sea-washed platform without soil or trees. They cleared the rock-strewn pavements to make dry-stone-walled enclosures. With layers of sand lain over seaweed from the seashore, they made fields for cattle and vegetable cultivation, finding an essential logic of accommodation and an aesthetic

-261-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Relating Architecture to Landscape
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 6
  • Section One 13
  • Introduction 15
  • Introduction - To Modern Gardens (1953) 16
  • Section Two 39
  • Introduction 41
  • Time and Temporality in Japanese Gardens 43
  • Notes 57
  • Some Recommended Books on Japanese Gardens 58
  • Detailing and Materials of Outdoor Space: the Scandinavian Example 59
  • Notes 75
  • Playing with Artifice: Roberto Burle Marx’s Gardens 77
  • Section Three 103
  • Introduction 105
  • External Interior/Internal Exterior Spaces at the Maeght Foundation 106
  • 1 - Plan of Prague Castle 120
  • References 157
  • The Re-Invention of the Site 158
  • Notes 172
  • Section Four 175
  • Introduction 177
  • Hans Scharoun, Schminke House, LöBau, Saxony 1932-33: Garden by Herta Hammerbacher and Hermann Mattern 178
  • Notes 193
  • 1 - Road to Acropolis, Sketch 194
  • Notes 204
  • Notes 227
  • Section Five 229
  • Introduction 231
  • The Necessity of Invention: Bernard Lassus’s Garden Landscapes 232
  • Notes 243
  • The Prospect at Dungeness: Derek Jarman’s Garden 244
  • Notes 258
  • Building in Nature 261
  • Contributors 281
  • Index 285
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 296

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.